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MEASUREMENT IN AEROSPACE


or non-line-of-sight solutions, and automation. Noncontact metrology is uniquely suited to solve many of the challenges faced by those trying to in- crease throughput. Aside from its ability to capture more data points quickly, especially across larger surfaces, it is also potentially easier to automate, which means less reliance on skilled workers.


Ease of use and speed are both qualities that Hexagon stressed in the development of its T-Scan 5 laser scanner that can work with laser trackers, like its new AT960.


Buying More CNCs to Drill & Tap - Think Again


4 Axis Simultaneous Tapping Machine


Laser Trackers Expand Dimensions Airframe manufacturers have used laser track- ers for the last 20 years, and the technology has evolved signifi cantly in that time. For example, O’Reilly points out that the FARO Vantage, the company’s latest release, offers a 25% reduction in size and weight over its predecessor. “This allows it to be stowed conveniently in a backpack and fi t into an airline overhead compartment,” he said. Laser tracker systems employ a laser beam mounted in a precision gimbal, to generate a refl ection off a spherically mounted retrorefl ector (SMR) to determine the distance to the SMR. These test points can then be referenced back to its CAD model. The Vantage provides test point


• High speed / short cycle time • Four lead screw tappers • Programmable control • Short setup time • Ease of adjustment


• Hands – Away operator safety feature


See this machine and others in action in our new video


Contact us Today for an ROI Analysis www.rockford-ettco.com Made in USA Always was and Always will be! Proven solutions from the brands you trust. UNIVERSAL - AUTOMATIC


3445 Lonergan Drive, Rockford, IL 61125


815/874-9421 Fax: 815/874-9425 304 Winston Creek Parkway,


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62 AdvancedManufacturing.org | April 2015


measurement over wings or fuselages, with up to 160 m of working volume coverage with accuracies up to 18 µm at 5 m (per ASME B89.4.19). While laser trackers are useful, espe- cially for parts the size of aircraft, they have limitations. They offer only three degrees-of-freedom (DOF) from the pedestal origin, since they can measure only areas in the line of sight of the laser. That is why the industry devel- oped two-device, 6 DOF systems such as the FARO TrackArm system. FARO essentially married the Vantage laser tracker to its Edge, Prime, or Fusion portable arm contact CMMs by placing an SMR on them. “The TrackArm com- bines our FARO Vantage Laser Tracker into a 6 DOF probe—enabling the user to switch between the FaroArm and Laser Tracker to reach hidden points,


Photo courtesy Hexagon Metrology


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