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COMPOSITES MACHINING


a vacuum frame or even adhesives to hold the part down and we have to develop cutting tools that reduce the cutting forces,” said Stephens. “The EXOPRO AERO HBC router features a diamond-coated herringbone for high-feed CNC applications that produces excellent surface finish. The EXOPRO AERO drill features diamond coating for clean entry and exit from the composite material.” Machining honeycombs is an entirely different matter. “In our original herring- bone compression router design, we featured a 30° helix. Compression-style rout- ers compress the laminate together with a left-hand and right-hand helix, leaving a clean edge on both top and bottom. What we found was that the 30° didn’t work in all cases, especially for fibers with higher strength. So we developed a 45° helix with a higher shearing capability for more difficult fibers. For the most difficult to cut Kevlar honeycombs, we developed a 60° helix that performs like a pair of scissors to cut the Kevlar very cleanly,” said Stephens.


PCD Veined Drills Feature Unique Solution Many of the most difficult challenges still originate with aircraft production generally and with jet engine applications specifically. The latest surge in jet engine design and production for new aircraft and for retrofit applications will ramp up demand for machining the toughest of materials, ceramic composites, with the hardest of materials, diamond. Sandvik Coromant (Fair Lawn, NJ) has developed its unique solution in a series of PCD-veined cutting tools for drills, mills, and end mills. “Series 85 geometry cutting tools provide a real alternative to brazed diamond-tipped tools, especially for ceramic composites that require the hardest material to drill,” according to Linn Win, composites product specialist for Sandvik Coromant. “Our PCD-veined series 85 geometry cutting tools are monolithic in structure. That means that they can be ground with various geometries and features that were once difficult to achieve in the past using conventional brazing methods,” said Win. The monolithic PCD-veined tool is formed by slitting a carbide nib in precise location and configuration in accordance to the customer’s requirements, filling the carbide nib with diamond powder, and then sintering the tool under high pressure and high heat. Once the nib is extracted from the pressure and heat vessel, the diamond has bonded with the carbide as one monolithic structure leaving no brazing weak points and allowing more options when grinding the cutters face geometry. “The monolithic struc- ture allows cutters to be reground multiple times, so that tools have the durability of diamond as well as the versatility of carbide,” said Win.


? Cincinnati Inc. 513-367-7100 / e-ci.com


Fives Cincinnati 859-534-4600 / fivesgroup.com


Komet of America Inc. 847-923-8400 / komet.com OSG USA Corp.


800-837-2223 / OSGtool.com


Sandvik Coromant 201-794-5000 / sandvik.coromant.com/us Seco Tools LLC


248-528-5200 / secotools.com/us April 2015 | AdvancedManufacturing.org 99


Buy online today. www.birchwoodtechnologies.com


Water Saving Finishing Solutions


TRU TEMP®


in-house black oxide on iron


F and contains no pollutants. Compliant for RoHS and Mil spec.


MICROLOK®


and steel components. Nothing like it. Safe, simple, 30-minute process operates at 200o


MZN a fine-grained zinc


phosphating solution for iron and steel components. Sealed with a rust preventative for excellent corrosion resistance & provides anti-galling protection & break-in lubricity. Compliant for MIL-DTL 16232G, Type Z.


Rinse discharge and water treatment options. Birchwood Technologies has options to greatly reduce water consumption even in locations with water restrictions. Call to discuss a proposal.


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