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VIEWPOINTS INDUSTRY LEADER OPINION & ANALYSIS Is Your Metrologist Really Certifi ed to Drive? v T


he shop fl oor is buzzing as everyone scurries to wrap up their activities for the end of the shift. Everyone that is, except for you and your team. You are getting ready to suit up and go full throttle. Your lane is open and you have exactly 8 hours to make it to the fi nish line. Only you are not looking for the checkered fl ag. Your victory will be to get in and assess the situation, position your instruments, perform the necessary calibration checks, determine proper tempera- ture coeffi cient/scale, collect all the required data, recheck your data, recheck scale, pack up and vacate the premises before the next shift swarms in. You have just entered an arena where time is critical, mistakes are not allowed, and what you report is considered to be accurate and depend- able. You are the metrologist, and lives may depend upon your output.


The million dollar question is: “Are you certifi ed?” Certifi cation means an individual has passed a number of stringent requirements on different levels developed by the Coordinate Metrology Society (CMS) and experts in the fi eld of portable metrology. With the seemingly endless dis- solution of apprenticeship programs, the CMS Certifi cation program serves as a reassurance that an individual has core knowledge of metrology, utilizes the proper measurement techniques, and most importantly, has accrued thousands of hours in the fi eld applying their skills to provide accurate and reliable data. As with any trade, it takes time to master best practices and apply them to any situation with effi ciency, ac- curacy and professionalism. The CMS Certifi cation is the only industry program of its kind to substantiate a candidate’s knowledge and ability in 3D portable measurement. Coordinate metrology has become a staple in manufac- turing, R&D, and science. Metrologists are relied upon more and more to provide data crucial to everything from medi- cal devices to aircraft and everything in between. Lives can depend upon accurate and timely data being delivered when needed. For the same reason you engage the services of a licensed engineer or have your auto serviced by a trained mechanic, you want to know that your metrologist provides


136 AdvancedManufacturing.org | April 2015


the highest standards available in workmanship and results. Through their know-how and effi ciency, certifi ed operators demonstrate their “return on investment” many times over. To start the certifi cation process, the applicant must have a minimum of two years actual experience, references from professionals in the fi eld, and accept the CMS Code of Eth- ics. Only after this criterion has been met will a candidate be allowed the take the Level-One Certifi cation assessment. This is a written exam with an in-depth matrix of topics such as interpretation of design documents, knowledge of the various PCMMs, job planning, performance of measurement operations, and analyzing data.


Certifi cation means an individual has passed a number of stringent require- ments on different levels developed by the Coordinate Metrology Society.


Upon passing the Level-One exam, the candidate can apply for the Level-Two Performance Certifi cation. To qualify, the metrologist must have two years basic experience (mini- mum 400 hours) on an articulating arm. This examination is a hands-on evaluation utilizing the PCMM to negotiate a set of designated tasks to prove ability and capture accurate data. This assessment is what separates the “drivers” from the passengers!


In addition, metrologists can earn career-enhancing cre- dentials, and apply industry best practices that are embed- ded throughout these certifi cation assessments. Because an operator dramatically infl uences data collection and analysis, it is important for an employer to understand if an employee or a metrology service provider can truly “drive” those por- table metrology systems with profi ciency. For more information on CMS Certifi cation, guidelines and application forms are available at our website: www.CMSC.org. Examinations will be held this summer in July at CMSC 2015 in Hollywood, FL.


Ron Rode 2015 CMSC Chair


Coordinate Metrology Society Weatherford, TX www.cmsc.org


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