This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
medical materials


to that of lead. Tungsten is a nontoxic inorganic material, so the customer can get the necessary radiation-shielding properties in a material that can be injection-molded using fairly conventional injection molding equipment. “Ecomass was originally marketed to the military as a


replacement material for lead in bullets—consider the amount of lead that must be present in a military shooting range. It’s been available for less than 10 years, and it’s starting to catch on now in the medical fi eld. The material is more expensive than lead, but the medical industry seems willing to bear that cost increase—the benefi ts are worth it,” Kvalo said.


Brass Tacking


Another material is moving into the medical realm from the world of plumbing—another industry that’s strived to get lead out of its products. It’s a kind of brass substitute made with a PPS plastic alloyed with glass, mineral and graphite. “Well-wearing machinable brass generally has lead in it in


order for it to achieve those properties,” Kvalo explained. The PPS alloy, like brass, is “very resistant to hot water, very re- sistant to massive fl uctuations in temperature that you see in a plumbing situation, and it wears real well—parts made from it can last 20–30 years”—but doesn’t contain lead. EVCO is working with a customer to bring the material into the medi- cal arena (and no, for the sake of customer confi dentiality, he can’t name the company).


From Plastic to Plastic If the industry’s move from metal to plastics bring pain to metal suppliers, they can take comfort from knowing that they’re not alone: a range of plastics too are being replaced by new and better formulations, and often for the same reason: the new stuff is either more cost-effective or safer than what it replaces. The poster child for a plastic that is being shown the exit in many medical applications is PVC. “When I started in medical device R&D 30 years ago, PVC


Ecomass Compounds are a line of patented, nontoxic, high-density thermoplastic composite materials that can be processed on conventional injection molding, compression molding, and extrusion equipment.


52 — Medical Manufacturing 2015


Photo courtesy Ecomass Technologies


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204  |  Page 205  |  Page 206  |  Page 207  |  Page 208  |  Page 209  |  Page 210  |  Page 211  |  Page 212  |  Page 213  |  Page 214  |  Page 215  |  Page 216  |  Page 217  |  Page 218  |  Page 219  |  Page 220  |  Page 221  |  Page 222  |  Page 223  |  Page 224  |  Page 225  |  Page 226  |  Page 227  |  Page 228  |  Page 229  |  Page 230  |  Page 231  |  Page 232