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fi cation. If that’s not large enough for the workpiece, the DCM8 has an XY topography stitching mode. Leveraging CAD In December, Hexagon Metrology (North Kings-


town, RI) released a signifi cant update of its soft- ware used to collect, evaluate, manage and present manufacturing data, PC-DMIS 2014.1. The update delivers performance improvements overall, and major enhancements for point cloud inspection and reverse engineering. “Our overall goal is to create a streamlined work-


fl ow for our customers through an unmatched user experience and state-of-the-art measurement technol- ogy,” said Ken Woodbine, president of Hexagon’s Metrology Software Division, of his company’s widely used software. “This assures they can quickly achieve the end results they need and get from what the op- erator wants to measure to the end result.” The update introduces user experience improvements for


“In the past, an operator identifi ed features of interest


through mouse selections, dialogue boxes or by keying in in- formation, but that’s now accomplished with visual cues and mouse or fi nger gesturing,” said Woodbine. “Roll the mouse over the CAD design and the software identifi es the feature of interest, a circle for example, and produces the optimal measurement strategy to create the results. “It’s a seamless way to quickly achieve measurements, fully leveraging the CAD design data in the process.” The new PC-DMIS benefi ts laser and optical measure- ment systems particularly, with new ways to work with and manage point cloud data. Laser scanner users are able to create a single mesh from any number of point clouds with a new command. In addition, new alignment and fi ltering tools increase the utility of laser scanners. For optical measuring, there’s a new distance-based


outlier fi lter to use with the automatic-hit-target method that reduces noise and increases accuracy. Also, one-click functionality is used to easily create auto features from the CAD model. Hexagon’s software developers have particularly focused on users with multisensor CMMs. These include diverse sensing technologies and part-holding technologies. A typical multisensor system from Hexagon may include a camera, laser, white light, analog scanning and tactile measuring sensors. Additionally the system can incorporate two rotary


Mitutoyo’s Quick Image 2-D color vision measuring system uses telecentric optics, making it a replacement for an optical comparator for small pieces.


productivity, like mouse-over functions for identifying features for measurement.


stages and dual Z axes. All of this combines to offer fl exibility in production of measurement routines. “Medical presents some of the most complex measure- ment tasks we see,” said Woodbine. “Multisensor provides the fl exibility, and PC-DMIS provides the simplicity to accom- plish the goal.” The key to harnessing this fl exibility is the software, said


Woodbine. PC-DMIS simplifi es inspection by harmonizing the user experience for all these sensor types into a streamlined workfl ow. “The fl exibility in the multisensor environment is simplifi ed


through a common workfl ow and a consistent presentation of the available tools,” Woodbine said. Improved accuracy for dual rotary tables on multisensor CMMs is included with newly refi ned calibration algorithms. Also for multi-sensor CMMS, a new laser wrist map algorithm outperforms previous versions by a factor of 10. Other tweaks include improved blade inspection effi -


ciency; fi ner customization of custom layouts; easier feature creation on complex geometries; and an update for angle dimensions.


Of special interest to medical manufacturers is a set of tools that provides support for the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)’s validation requirements. The software itself goes through rigorous control processes to assure it performs as intended, Woodbine explained. And document control features provide lifecycle management for the rou- tines developed by the customer. “This helps assure our products support a customer’s validation of their process to FDA requirements,” Woodbine said.


43 — Medical Manufacturing 2015


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