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can be used for part confi r- mation or 2D barcodes can be read for part identifi - cation to ensure that the correct part program is executed on the machine tool. Both 2D and 3D vision systems can be used for picking randomly placed parts from a bin, fl exible feeding device, trays/pal- lets, or a moving con- veyor to take advantage of noncutting cycle time, minimize expensive fi xtures and allow for untended operation. These systems can be used to identify and track parts as they are


FANUC/Rockwell Automation integrated machining cell architecture with EtherNet/IP.


fed into the machine tool and unloaded for the next operation, and this information can be provided for SPC data collection. Additionally, while the machines are cutting, the robot can be utilized for other processes such as material removal, gaging, inspections, part cleaning, and assembly. A standard interface between a robot and any machine


tool signifi cantly reduces the integration time and cost. Robots and multiple CNCs can be easily connected over Eth- ernet, I/O Link, and FL Net using the Machine Tool and Robot Connection functions. Robot operation and monitoring can be performed through one of the integrated or custom CNC screens in an automated cell without entering the safety zone of the robot. Conversely, screens on the robot teach pendant can be used for complete CNC and robot system operation when the CNC control panel is located inside the robot. This allows for a more effi cient use of fl oor space as one opera- tor can run multiple machines/cells while reducing part setup time and increasing fl exibility.


Pre-Engineered Integrated Automation Solution In today’s complex regulatory and highly competitive medical market environment, it is critical to have a coordinat- ed manufacturing system and the supporting infrastructure to keep the workfl ow organized, effi cient and documented. To address the market challenges, a pre-engineered integrated automated solution for medical device manufacturing is available. This integrates CNCs and robots to cell control- lers to provide cost effi ciencies, better part quality, usable manufacturing intelligence and overall increased productiv-


ity. Simplifi ed machin- ing system architecture reduces start-up time and system engineering costs for machine tool builders to integrate CNCs and robots with a cell controller. Pro- cess and machine condition data is easily transferred to enterprise IT systems enabling better decision making and cost reduction. EtherNet/IP is an example of a network that can be utilized to connect the cell controller to CNCs, robots and other devices. An integrated solution is ideal for an automated machin-


ing cell comprised of one or several CNCs cutting parts, and robots handling part load/unload, coolant and chip removal systems, deburring and washing machines, part marking and identifi cation, inspection stations, and more. Common connectivity to EtherNet/IP simplifi es system engineering and maintenance signifi cantly.


Lowest Total Cost of Ownership The fi rst and most critical step to succeed in machining the highest quality medical parts at the lowest total cost of ownership is with a CNC system that is reliable, effi cient and innovative. Specifi cally, a CNC system that has nanometer resolution throughout the system achieves superior precision and surface fi nish quality. Advanced innovative CNC technol- ogies assure the fastest cycle times without sacrifi cing quality, lowering the cost per part and increasing machining capacity to avoid the need to add equipment or increase overhead. Select CNCs that have the features necessary to support the most effi cient CAD/CAM/machine workfl ows for fi ve-axis and complex medical machining applications. To support even more advanced process automation, CNCs need to support Ethernet connectivity to manufacturing and business net- works for process monitoring and validation, and robots for cellular automation. Additionally, look for a CNC system with the highest Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF) in the industry coupled with lifetime maintenance which will ensure the lowest total cost of ownership. In the end, a CNC manufac- turer that supports their CNC for its entire production life will increase ROI for medical device manufacturing companies.


47 — Medical Manufacturing 2015


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