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$10,000.00 Donation to help Dover Schools


After last month’s devastating fire, many individuals and businesses have stepped up to help out.


Seven Dover High School Graduates are Cimarron Electric Co-op Em-


ployees, in addition to Robert Yeoman, a Trustee on Cimarron Electric’s board. On hand for the check presentation are: front row, from left: Bryan Randle, Melissa Meyer, Dover Supt. Shannon Grimes, Robert


Yeoman, Dover Principal Trilla Cranford and Mark Andrews; back row, Rodney Johnson, Chris Kubat, Chris Bailey and G.R. Kirkpatrick.


“Of the seven cooperative prin- ciples that we follow at Cimarron Electric Cooperative, the seventh principle of Concern for Com- munity was brought to mind after the fire in Dover destroyed the high school,” Cimarron CEO Mark Snowden said. “In each of the com- munities within our nine-county service territory, the school is an extremely important part of the community’s existence. We felt the need to provide some financial assistance to help the students and community at Dover after this devastating event.”


Supreme Court Puts Hold on EPA Clean Power Plan By Cathy Cash | ECT Staff Writer


Published: February 10th, 2016 Electric cooperatives said they welcome the U. S. Supreme Court’s Feb. 9


decision to block the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Power Plan until all legal challenges to it are resolved.


Temporary classrooms are con-


structed in old gym after the fire destroyed the high school.


“Charging ahead with implementation of the Clean Power Plan would have caused immediate and irreparable harm to America’s electric co-ops,” said NRECA interim CEO Jeffrey Connor. “Had the stay not been granted, co-ops would have been forced to take costly and irreversible steps to comply with the rule, which is a huge overreach of EPA’s legal authority. The Clean Power Plan is a direct threat to co-ops’ ability to provide affordable and reliable electricity to their member consumers and should be erased from the books.”


Under the 5-4 order, the Clean Power Plan is on hold until the Supreme Court either takes up the case and issues a final decision, or denies a request to hear an appeal. That means a final resolution might not come until 2017. A federal appeals court is scheduled to take up arguments on the case in June. Basin Elec- tric Power Cooperative petitioned the Supreme Court Jan. 27 to stay the Clean Power Plan after a federal appeals court rejected pleas to halt the rule. NRECA, 38 electric co-ops and other utility interests joined the petition.


If there is a will, there is a way. Classes continue in the temporary classrooms.


The order, issued without explanation, responds to a similar request filed by 29 states and industry interests. Legal analysts noted that it is unusual for the court to issue such a stay when a regulation has been finalized, indicating the court has doubts about the plan’s legality.


The Clean Power Plan sets carbon dioxide limits for each state to achieve an overall emissions reduction of 32 percent below 2005 levels by 2030. The rule’s compliance period was set to begin in 2022. It is aimed at fossil-fuel generation. NRECA estimated that total compliance costs for electric co-ops could reach as much as $28 billion. An appeals court is scheduled to hear arguments in June.


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