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Northfork Electric


Cooperative, Inc. Operating in


Beckham, Roger Mills, Washita, Greer, Custer, Harmon, and Dewey


SCOTT COPELAND GENERAL MANAGER BOARD OF TRUSTEES


Jimmy Taylor-Pres ............................. Elk City Charles Hickey-V. Pres .....................Reydon Ransom Snowden-Sec-Treas ...........Erick Chris Mackey ....................................... Sayre Larry Smith ..................................Cheyenne Lloyd Joe Patton ............................... Sayre Danny Davis .....................................Elk City Brendon Atkinson........................Attorney


SAYRE OFFICE


Kenny Waugh ................Mgr. of Marketing Lisa Dailey................Mgr. of Office Services Jeff Mohr ................Mgr. of Acct. & Finance Kay Brown ............................Adm. Assistant Richard Bowdre ............... Operations Mgr. Heath Martin...........................Safety Director


REYDON OFFICE Barbara Swope ..........................655-4557


FOR OUTAGES AFTER 5 P.M. CALL 1-800-NO-VOLTS (1-800-668-6587) or


(580) 928-3366


OFFICE HOURS 8 AM TO 5 PM MONDAY-FRIDAY


DATES TO REMEMBER READINGS MUST BE IN NORTHFORK OFFICE BY THE 10th


TO BE USED FOR BILLING ADDRESS


P.O. Box 400


SAYRE, OK 73662 301 E. MAIN


Kay Rabbitt-Brower.......Editor OF EACH MONTH


Wildfires can voraciously destroy homes, equipment, and property and even take the lives of elite professionals. NFEC encourages you to learn about prevention and prepare for dangers related to wildfires. The USDA Forest Service reports wildfires can be caused by lightning; however, nine out of 10 wildfires are caused by people. Whether you are run- ning equipment, burning debris, or tend- ing a campfire—always make sure the fire, sparks, and embers are contained and safely extinguished. Small fires that get out of control can quickly become a big problem.


Fire that gets near power lines can create additional hazards. To help you stay safe, we offer the following tips: • If you see downed power lines, or other damaged electrical equipment, notify the local electric utility as soon as possible because the lines could still be live and present a fire risk. • Downed power lines, stray wires, and debris in contact with them all have the potential to deliver a fatal shock. Stay clear of fallen power lines and damaged areas that could hide a hazard. • Contact NFEC immediately if you see fire near transmission or distribution lines.


This institution is an equal oppor- tunity provider and employer.


If a wildfire is threatening your area, stay tuned to local media for reports and evacuation information. Smoke limits visibility, and evacuation


Wildfires and Electrical Safety


Preventing and Preparing for a Battle with a Blaze


By Heath Martin NFEC Safety Director


routes can be cut off by fire, traffic, or fallen trees or power lines. Follow the instructions of local officials. If you are ordered to evacuate—do so. If you have enough time, turn off the


electricity, water, gas, and propane tanks as well as any other bottled gas you may have before evacuation. In addition, disconnect appliances and electronics to reduce the chance of electrical shock when power is restored. With plenty of advance time and planning, there are other actions you can take to help protect your home. According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), you can take steps to reduce your home’s expo- sure to flames and radiant heat—both outside and in. A full list can be found on FEMA’s preparedness website, www. ready.gov. Some of these steps include: • Raking leaves, dead limbs, and twigs; and clearing all flammable veg- etation. • Asking your electric utility to clear branches from power lines. • Removing tree limbs within 15 feet of the ground. • Clearing at least a 10-foot area around propane tanks. • Also clearing a minimum 10-foot area around the barbecue, and placing a screen over the grill—using nonflam- mable material with mesh no coarser than one-quarter inch.


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