search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Augmented Reality


Anatomy 4D – Explore the various systems within the human body and see them at work; dissect animals with no mess


Apps and Web Resources


Apps and Web Resources


for Elementary Educators and Students


for Elementary Educators and Students


Crayola Color Alive – AR coloring sheets


Elements 4D – Learn about the elements of the Periodic Table.


Enchantium – Take part in an interactive 4D fairy tale adventure Quiver – AR coloring sheets


Coding


Cargo-bot Code.org Daisy the Dinosaur Flappy Bird Hopscotch Kodable Lightbot One Hour Coding ScratchJr Tynker


Design


Canva – design basics Tinkercad – 3D design Pixel Press Floors – video game creation


Other


Mystery Word Town – sight word spelling Dreambox – web-based math program Big universe – online library Stop-motion Studio – movie making app


Teachers


Classroom dojo – track classroom behavior Canvas – learning management system Google classroom


Apps are downloadable through the Apple App Store (Apple devices) and Google Play (Android devices).


digitally on Google Drive. She adds that the kids are excited to share their stories with a global environment. “If they write for the teacher they won’t produce what they would when they are writing for the outside community,” she says. “It gives them more purpose to know other kids can read what they write.”


Creating Cutting-Edge Classrooms James Elliott is the assistant superintendent of the Coffeyville, Kan.,


school district, where he oversees the district’s Information Technology pro- gram. During his 14-year tenure, the rural, low-income district has been on the cutting edge technologically. Despite the fact that the school’s classrooms are equipped with the latest


technology, Elliott, a Northeast Oklahoma Electric Cooperative member, says the district’s most important investment is not in equipment—it’s in people. For the teachers, the district provides training, coaching and funding for technology. “We are teched-up,” he says. “We expect high-level uses of technology, but if the technology is there and you don’t know how to use it, it’s a waste. “If we see teacher struggling or if they are not using technology in class- room, we have a technology coach who sits in their classroom and


formulates a plan to help the teacher integrate technology into their lesson plans.” Teachers are encouraged to explore innovative ways to use technology in the classroom, and if they have a particular need, the district offers stipends to purchase those items. In turn, they are expected to share the results with their colleagues at one of the school’s 40, hour-long technology trainings offered each year. Elliott says the focus on technology enables students to take charge of the


learning process; teachers serve as their guides. The school has a saying, “two before me,” which reminds students to identify two resources to try and answer a question before asking the teacher. This instills confi dence in the students, from an early age, to use the technology that’s available at their fi ngertips.


“If we don’t teach kids how to learn, to teach themselves, we’re not doing them any benefi t,” Elliott says. He believes teaching students to solve problems is critical to their educa- tion, and the ability to use technology is a vital part of equipping students for the workplace of the future. “Change is going to happen. We can either embrace it or resist it but it will happen,” he says. “Our challenge is to change with change.”


MARCH 2016 15


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120