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A SUPPLEMENT TO OKLAHOMA LIVING


MARCH 2016 | VOLUME 67 ISSUE 3 | PUBLISHED FOR MEMBERS OF TRI-COUNTY ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE LIVEWIRE CEO VIEW


Rules & Regulations By Jack L. Perkins


TCEC periodically reviews its Rules and Regulations of Service for changes needed, which the Board of Trustees review and approve. Revised regulations took effect February 1, 2016.


The revised regulations include the new rate for TCEC’s community solar offering to members. All members will benefit from this program because it reduces peak demand for the cooperative. Community Solar from TCEC is an affordable option for members to participate in renewable energy without worrying about installation and maintenance costs. We take care of that.


Other minor changes were made for clarification under the facility extension, oil and natural gas rate and cooperative service obligation sections.


TCEC’s Rules and Regulations of Service are published at www.tcec.coop under the ‘About’ tab. I encourage anyone with questions regarding these changes to contact our Member Service department by calling 580.652.2418. We will be happy to discuss them with you. 


L-R Kyle Osborn, B.J. Appleton, Kyle Weber, TCEC linemen, Zac Perkins, chief operating officer, Lyle Mathis, vice president-Operations, Eric Brown, journeyman electrician, and Francisco Rodriguez, electrician assistant.


Seven Fire Extinguishers Were Not Enough by Derrill Holly, NRECA


Weber was riding with apprentice Kyle Osborn and groundman B.J. Appleton when they came across a pickup engulfed in fl ames after a collision with a semitrailer near Turpin, Okla.


J


With the driver pinned inside his pickup, the three employees of Oklahoma’s Tri-County Electric Cooperative sprung into action. “We couldn’t get him out of the vehicle so we provided fi rst aid while he was still trapped inside. We called 911, and fought the blaze for about 15 minutes,” Weber recalled. “We must have used more than seven fi re extinguishers to put out the fi re.”


Though the driver did not survive, the trio’s actions were worthy of a Touchstone Energy® Power and Hope award, one of two sets of such awards handed out recently at the Hooker- based co-op.


The co-op crew put out the fi re before fi re and rescue crews arrived, while tending to the rig driver and an injured passenger. “The help provided by these individuals was just awesome,” said Chief Gary Riffe of the Turpin Volunteer Fire Department.


In the second case, two other Tri-County EC staffers saved a lost child who apparently


ourneyman lineman Kyle Weber remembers this about the blaze: Seven fi re extinguishers were not enough.


wandered away from his home on a frigid morning.


Journeyman electrician Eric Brown and electrician assistant Francisco Rodriguez were heading out on a bitterly cold day in early December when they found a toddler alone in subfreezing temperatures. They notifi ed local police that they had a missing child in their hands. Then, Brown said, “We wrapped the boy in a jacket and started knocking on neighborhood doors.” “The boy was about two years old and could not talk or communicate,” said Brown, adding that they knocked on doors for about 20 to 30 minutes before police arrived. The child was taken back to the police station and eventually reunited with his family.


“I found a post on the police department Facebook page later in the day indicating the boy’s parents had been located,” said Rodriguez, adding that police provided few details about the incident. Zac Perkins, chief operating offi cer of TCEC, joined senior managers in presenting the co-op employees involved in the two incidents with Power and Hope awards during a Feb. 3 recognition ceremony at co-op headquarters. “These fi ve men went above and beyond the call of duty when they stopped to help in extreme circumstances,” Perkins said. 


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