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Commentary ‘Time out’ called on Clean Power Plan R


Chris Meyers General Manager, Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives


ural electric cooperatives— along with 27 states including


Oklahoma, various state agencies and industry groups—petitioned the U.S. Supreme Court for a stay or “time out” from


the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Clean Power Plan (CPP). The rule proposes the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions from pow- er generation plants by 32 percent below 2005 levels by the year 2030. We have long been making the argument that


EPA exceeded its authority under the Clean Air Act in the proposed and subsequent fi nal rule. On February 9, the U.S. Supreme Court—by a vote of 5-4—agreed there are serious legal ques- tions surrounding the rule and granted a stay until the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit hears arguments in the case. Never before has the U.S. Supreme Court issued a stay for a regulation prior to a decision by a lower court. Regardless of the D.C. Circuit Court’s


decision, the CPP is likely headed back to the U.S. Supreme Court. Until all legal challenges are satisfi ed, the rule and its deadlines are placed on hold. To illustrate how important this stay is, we need only look at another EPA rule—the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS). No stay by the courts was granted for this rule. By the time the MATS case reached the U.S. Supreme Court, nearly all expenditures and implementation of the rule had been completed. The Court’s deci- sion denying the rule was too late—utilities had already made investments. The CPP is like no other regulation. It has


far-reaching and signifi cant impacts on reliability and affordability. It merits a “time-out.” Electric cooperatives are leaders in the integra- tion of renewables like wind and solar energy as power sources with or without the CPP. We care about our environment and always strive to be better, more effi cient and affordable. We also respect the rule of law and must pro- ceed within the authorities granted by Congress to agencies.


Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives Chris Meyers, General Manager Kendall Beck, President


Gary McCune, Vice-President Scott Copeland, Secretary Larry Hicks, Treasurer


Staff


Sid Sperry, Director of PR & Communications sksperry@oaec.coop


Anna Politano, Editor editor@ok-living.coop


Daniel Yates, Advertising Manager dyates@ok-living.coop


Kirbi Mills, Director of Admin. Services kmills@oaec.coop


Hillary Barrow, Accountant/Offi ce Manager Asst. hbarrow@oaec.coop


Hayley Leatherwood, Multimedia Specialist hleatherwood@ok-living.coop


Taryn Sanderson, Editorial Intern intern@oaec.coop


Editorial, Advertising and General Offi ces P.O. Box 54309, Oklahoma City, OK 73154 Phone (405) 478-1455


Oklahoma Living online: www.ok-living.coop Subscriptions


$3.48 per year for rural electric cooperative members.


$7 per year for non-members. Electricity powers technologies I


Kendall Beck President, Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives


t’s mind-blogging how technology continues to evolve and change our lifestyles. The widespread use of com- puters, tablets and smart- phones has changed the dynamics of many busi- nesses and households, not to mention the myri-


ad of video games that captivate younger gen- erations. There are even smart thermostats that allow consumers to control their home tempera- ture from an app and kitchen appliances that pre- warn or tell consumers when a problem exists. These devices continue to evolve and become more sophisticated, in many cases doing more than what we expect or even comprehend. As changes develop rapidly in the technology realm, one thing remains constant: electricity. Electric power is the means through which these devices are possible. Electricity powers every- thing in your homes and businesses from cell phone chargers that keep you connected to re- frigerators and air conditioning units that keep


you cool in the summer. How that electricity is delivered to you de- pends greatly on a ‘technology’ that God deliv- ered to men when He created the Earth: a tree. Yep, electricity is provided to homes and busi- nesses in this country mostly across wooden poles. It’s funny how technology changes, but the base stays the same. Electric cooperatives are leaders in implementing new technologies to the generation, transmission and delivery of electricity. Oklahoma’s electric cooperatives were formed nearly 80 years ago. While many technological advances have taken place in the span of eight decades, the concept of electricity is unchanged. It still impacts consumers today as it did 80 years ago when poles and wires brought light to power rural Oklahoma. Electricity is vital to any nation, tribe, state or city. It’s vital in our communities as it empowers co-op members to enjoy a better quality of life. Let the technologies of today keep advancing. We will be right here: working dili- gently to deliver safe, reliable and affordable electricity to co-op member-owners.


Cooperative Members: Report change of


address to your local rural electric cooperative. Non-Cooperative Members: Send address


changes to Oklahoma Living, P.O. Box 54309, Oklahoma City, OK 73154-1309.


Oklahoma Living (ISSN 1064-8968),


USPS 407-040, is published monthly for consumer-members of Oklahoma’s rural electric cooperatives by the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives, 2325 E. I-44 Service Road, P.O. Box 54309, Oklahoma City, OK 73154-1309.


Circulation this issue: 321,402


Periodical postage paid at Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Association of Electric


Cooperatives is a statewide service organization for the following electric cooperatives: Alfalfa, Arkansas Valley, Caddo, Canadian Valley,


Central Rural, Choctaw, Cimarron, Cookson Hills, Cotton, East Central Oklahoma, Harmon, Indian, KAMO Power, Kay, Kiamichi, Kiwash, Lake Region, Northeast Oklahoma, Northfork,


Northwestern, Oklahoma, Ozarks, People’s, Red River Valley, Rural, Southeastern, Southwest


Rural, Tri-County, Verdigris Valley, and Western Farmers Electric Cooperative.


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