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Stay Safe at a Dangerous Job


Farming is one of the most dangerous professions in the country, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Electricity is essential to the operation of a farm but, like so many other tools, can be dangerous. Safe Electricity encourages farmers to protect themselves from the hazards of electricity and to share electrical safety information with family and workers to help keep them safe.


Safe Electricity recommends the following tips to help you stay safe on the farm:


• Keep yourself and equipment 10 feet away from overhead power lines in all directions, at all times.


• Conduct a survey before you begin work. Know where overhead power lines are, and have a plan to stay far from them.


• Use a spotter. When raising any equipment such as augers, grain trucks, and even ladders, it can be diffi cult to tell how close you are to overhead power lines.


• Know what to do if you come in contact with an overhead power line. Do not leave the vehicle until utility workers have cut off electricity and confi rmed that it is safe to exit the vehicle.


• Always lower portable augers or elevators to their lowest possible level-under 14 feet-before moving or transporting them. Variables like wind, uneven ground, shifting weight, or other conditions can make it diffi cult to control raised equipment.


• Never try to move a power line to clear a path. Power lines start to sag over time, bringing them closer to farmers and equipment. Contact Harmon Electric to repair sagging power lines.


For more information about electrical safety on the farm visit SafeElectricity.org.


MONTHLY OUTAGE REPORT


This report is new for the newsletter and is designed to inform you on how many outages we deal with on a monthly basis, average time off, and the cause of the outage. We hope this information is helpful and informative. Please let us know if you like the information and if there is anything else we can do to keep you informed about your cooperative. All of us at Harmon Electric realize that we are here for you, our member/owner. Our goal as always, is to provide you the best service at the lowest possible cost.


MAY, 2015 NO. OF OUTAGES


38 1 3 1 3 1 2 1 4


CAUSE OF OUTAGE


Lightning Truck ran through line Tree


Broke insulator Wind WFEC Animal


Broke pole Unknown


NO. OF METERS AFFECTED


166 13 5 1


71


1,167 161 1 6


For the month of May, Harmon Electric experienced 54 separate outages. The total members affected were 1,591 with an average time off of 2.5 hours. The majority of members affcted were due to the Granite Sub being off on the 16th of May. WFEC lost some transmission poles feeding the substation due to storms in the area. This impacted 1,167 meters and time off was around 3 1/4 hours.


HARMON ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION, INC 114 North First Hollis, OK 73550


Operating in


Beckham, Harmon, Jackson, Kiowa and Greer Counties in Oklahoma and Hardeman and Childress Counties in Texas


Member of Western Farmers Electric Cooperative Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives National Rural Electric Cooperative Association National Rural Telecommunications Cooperative Texas Electric Cooperative, Inc. Oklahoma Rural Water Association, Inc.


HARMON ELECTRIC HI-LITES - Lisa Richard, Editor The Harmon Electric Hi-Lites is the publication of your local owned and operated rural electric cooperative, organized and incorporated under the laws of Oklahoma to serve you with low-cost electric power.


Charles Paxton ......................................................................................... Manager


BOARD OF TRUSTEES Pete Lassiter ..................................................................................................District 1 Jim Reeves ....................................................................................................District 2 Lee Sparkman ...............................................................................................District 3 Bob Allen .......................................................................................................District 4 Burk Bullington ..............................................................................................District 5 Jean Pence ....................................................................................................District 6 J R Conley .....................................................................................................District 7 Charles Horton .............................................................................................. Attorney


Monthly Board of Directors meetings Held Fourth Thursday of Each Month


IF YOUR ELECTRICITY GOES OFF, REPORT THE OUTAGE


We have a 24-hour answering service to take outage reports and dispatch service- men. Any time you have an outage to report in the Hollis or Gould exchange area, call our offi ce at 688-3342. Any other exchange


area call toll free, 1-800-643-7769.


TO REPORT AN OUTAGE, CALL 688-3342 or 1-800-643-7769 ANYTIME


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