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July 2015


NORTHWESTERN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE, INC. NWEC celebrates 75 years of cooperative power T


his July, the 10th to be exact, marks the 75th anniversary of the formation of Northwestern Electric Cooperative. As we celebrate this milestone, we take time to reflect back on the rich history of the electric cooperative movement and how a small group of determined indi- viduals were able to improve their quality of life and the quality of life for all those who would come after them.


Our founding co-op members believed that we would all prosper by helping each other. And we continue to carry on that tradition to- day. Like other coop- eratives around the world, Northwestern Electric operates according to a core set of principles. By practicing the seventh cooperative principle—concern for community— we work for the sustainable develop- ment of our communities.


Hidden account number contest


Last month’s numbers went unclaimed. They belonged to Joe McLain and Jack Redfearn. We have hidden two account


numbers somewhere in the articles in this newsletter. The numbers will always be enclosed in parentheses and will look similar to this example (XXXXXX).


If you recognize your account


number, give us a call on or before the 8th of the current month and we’ll give you a credit on your bill for the amount stated. This month’s numbers are worth $75 each. Happy hunting!


16 oz. sour cream 16 oz. cream cheese 1/3 cup sugar


2 teaspoons vanilla extract 4 lbs. green seedless grapes 4 lbs. red seedless grapes 1 quart strawberries 4 cups pecan halves


In a large bowl, beat cream cheese and sugar together. Add sour cream and vanilla. Fold in all other ingredients making sure to coat evenly. Save a little fruit and pecans for garnishing.


Serves 15-20 people


We understand the decisions we make today could greatly affect how future generations live. Through our grassroots advocacy efforts, we help influence policy decisions that will af- fect our communities now and for years to come. We are the catalyst for change in our communities. We leverage our collective power to get things done. (18151001)


By working together and partnering with other co-ops, local businesses and com- munity organizers, we can achieve eco- nomic development goals. Our joint efforts create better opportunities and increase the quality of life for our families and communities—just as our founding co-op members did.


We help build the next genera- tion of leadership through our Youth Tour program by sending high school students to Washington, D.C. to meet with law makers and get an up-close view of how our government func-


tions. Youth Tour participants leave our nation’s capi- tal feeling ener- gized. It inspires them to make a difference in their communities and gives them a new perspec- tive. Youth Tour provides young


Page 3


Tyson Littau, CEO


people from our communities with an opportunity they may otherwise have never known.


All of these things, plus so much more, are what make-up the coop- erative difference. This July, as we celebrate our past, we also think about the future of electric cooperatives and how we will continue to shape our country and our society. Our board, staff and employees remember what it took to bring power to the countryside and we let the determination of those who came before us, guide us. We look forward to another 75 years of providing safe, affordable and reliable electricity and giving back to the communities we serve.


Grape Salad


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