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NEFCPRESIDENT’S MESSAGE Challenging Times


Challenging times are not always a bad thing. Sometimes obstacles arise that are different than we normally face. The beneficial part of it is when this happens we are forced to think in a different manner than we normally do and therefore come up with new and different solutions. The past several years have not been much fun for people involved in agriculture. We were faced with many new challenges. By going through these times and being forced to come up with various solutions to problems, my operation is stronger today than it was before the drought. At one point or another during the past four years, every pond and both creeks that run through my ranch went dry. I felt like I was continually a half step ahead of disaster, especially in the beginning. Cattle were continually needing to be moved because of no wa- ter, bad water or getting bogged down in mud. Thanks to those experiences and the assistance of my rural water district, I now have a much better water infrastructure in place. That first summer, my feed bill


skyrocketed. I was not only running the feed truck in the summer time but I was feeding hay too. The hay that could be found was so far away the freight bill to get it here was often higher than the cost of the hay itself. I used this op- portunity to teach my calves to eat feed and hay at an early age to help with the development of their marbling. When the early weaning program was


implemented to take stress off the cows during these hard times, the calves were already on feed. With little or no grass available, re- ducing the cowherd was a must during these times. These reductions, along


drought. By facing these obstacles and finding solutions to them your opera- tions are stronger and better prepared for the future. At Northfork we have had our own unique set of challenges recently. The cause of most of these has been our rapid growth. Scott, his staff and em- ployees were able to handle that growth in an orderly and beneficial manner to the cooperative. The outside employees were faced with a work-order count that averaged 160 – 180 for months. As they were working through these they would also make improvements to the infrastruc- ture along the way. As a result today and into the future our members will enjoy a stronger, more reliable system. The inside employees were faced with


You can follow the construction progress of our new building. Visit www.nfecoop.com and click on the New Facility tab.


with implementing a timed AI program (made more feasible because the cattle were in a more confined area due to lack of water) should help the quality of my herd when the time to start expand- ing comes. I’m sure if you are a farmer or rancher


you each had your own unique set of circumstances to overcome due to the


their own set of growth challenges, the primary one being lack of space. We had outgrown our building. What used to be our lobby now serves as office space for two employees. The solution to this chal- lenge is about to become a reality. The new campus is coming along nicely and should be ready to move into this October. I would like to thank everyone for their support of our build- ing project. This facility should serve our cooperative well for many years to come. Challenging times can be opportuni- ties to improve the future by participat- ing in finding solutions. I encourage everyone to come participate in the future of your cooperative by attend- ing the Northfork annual meeting on August 15. I’ll see you there.


2014 Annual Report Page 3


JIMMY TAYLOR PRESIDENT,


BOARD OF TRUSTEES


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