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vision feedback, then offsets the part for loading either the main or sub-spindle of the machine tool. O.D. to I.D. run out of the aluminum impacts is a maximum of 0.085" [2 mm] and mandrel load clearance is 0.030" [0.76 mm] at maximum material condition. “The robot is equipped with a single, pneumatic two-jaw gripper with inter- changeable chuck jaws specifically designed for these parts. The parts are gripped by their outside diameters for loading onto the sub-spindle OP10 arbor and for removal from the machine tool’s main spindle chuck. The robot system interfaces with the Okuma lathe using Ethernet I/P,” said Eddy. To meet Loveridge’s part inspection requirements, Hartwig and Gosiger Automa- tion chose the Renishaw Equator for its versatility, precision and reliability. The gage uses an SP25 scanning probe to take thousands of data points, much like a coor- dinate measuring machine (CMM). However, while most CMMs are designed for off-floor operation, the Equator was built for use in the manufacturing environment. However, Loveridge was looking for more than part inspection, they also wanted to use this data for statistical process control (SPC). The answer was to take the data from the Renishaw Equator and process it through Caron Engineering’s AutoComp software. Ryan Hegman, national sales manager for Caron Engineering said: “After every fourth part is machined, the Fanuc robot places the part into the Renishaw Equator for scanning. The data are then sent to the AutoComp software, which pro- cesses the information and compares it to the master. If the software determines that an


Okuma’s LB-3000EX-MYW CNC lathe is at the heart of Loveridge Machine's workcell.


offset (in 10 thousandths of an inch increments) is necessary to maintain accurate machining, it works through the Okuma OSP control to make the correction. All of this happens automatically, with no operator intervention necessary.” Automating a manufacturing process to meet specific customer wishes means pulling together a variety of resources and integrating them as seamlessly as pos- sible. “Gosiger Automation, Renishaw and Caron all worked with us to meet the cus- tomer’s expectations. In addition, the people of Loveridge Machine were supportive and cooperative every step of the way, which is critical to this kind of installation. We all worked together to give them the results they were looking for: reduced cost-per- part, better use of their manpower and a system that keeps pumping out quality parts,” said Hartwig’s Scott Clinger. ME


For more information from Gosiger Automation, go to www.gosiger.com, or phone 877-288-1538; from Hartwig Inc. go to www.hartwiginc.com or phone 314- 426-5300; from Okuma America Corp., go to www.okuma.com, or phone 704-588- 7000; from Renishaw Inc., go to www.renishaw.com, or phone 847-286-9953; from Caron Engineering, go to www.caroneng.com, or phone 207-646-6071.


June 2014 | ManufacturingEngineeringMedia.com 91


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