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Here’s a great idea for: Milling cast iron NEW hi.aeQ face milling cutter


A high-effi ciency tool for counterboring and milling


Gear Manufacturing


Ingersoll’s indexable carbide inserts for machining large gears, including hobs and gashing tools.


“Most of our customers can already make good quality gears with their current equipment—but they’re trying to in- crease productivity with no loss of quality,” said Frank Berardi, gear machining product manager at Ingersoll Cutting Tools. “Usually we’re taking first-time customers from high-speed steel to carbide, and that brings a big jump in productivity right there.”


The idea: Providing a quiet, stable, fl exible, and highly-effective


milling solution.


Why it’s great: • High number of inserts resulting in quick machining and low cutting forces.


• 8 usable cutting edges per insert for cost-effective production.


• Available with or without internal coolant.


Learn more about this and other great ideas. Go to www.komet.com/greatideas or scan this QR code.


A more recent design innovation is allowing Ingersoll’s cli- ents to work more effectively with smaller gear sizes. “Most of our work in gearcutting has been focused on the larger gears used in the mining, power generation, and construction indus- tries, to name a few—industries that generally use 8 Module and higher,” said Berardi. [‘Module’—the ratio of the pitch diameter in millimeters to the number of teeth—is a standard gear measurement unit.] “Basically customers adapted our products to their larger gears first, and then asked what we could do for these smaller gear sizes. With our radial insert design, we now have an answer for them.” In recent years Ingersoll has concentrated in producing gearcutters for the smaller gear tooth sizes, particularly in the 4–8 Module range, where Berardi says there has been a void of indexable insert products. That size is used by customers in the medical-equipment and large-truck industries as well as other industries. “The challenge has always been how to pro- duce cutters with secure insert retention in the smaller tooth forms,” Berardi explained. “To accomplish this we developed new concepts for indexable insert hobs, which utilize radial mounted inserts instead of our typical tangential inserts.” Tangentials can get down to about 6 Module. Any smaller than that and it becomes difficult to make an insert small enough to locate in pocket, and clamp it down and be robust, according to Berardi. The radial mounted design can get down to 4 Module. The tradeoff is that the radial design allows a fewer number of indexes—however, the advantages of the radial design more than compensates. The radial insert design allows for a larger, more secure insert pocket. The hobs can be made with screw-down or clamp style inserts. Also important, the radial insert hob has double the number of effective teeth as a tangential insert hob of the same size. “This results in much higher productiv- ity,” said Berardi. The hobs can be produced in single and multiple-start versions.


—Michael C. Anderson, Senior Editor


www.komet.com 800-656-6381


56 ManufacturingEngineeringMedia.com | June 2014


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