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Overview In January, 2013, A123 Energy Solutions provided Ray


Power Systems with a 2-MW energy storage system to be in- stalled in China. And on June 3 the company announced that it had provided a long-duration grid storage system for the Maui Electric Company in Hawaii as a key component of its Smart Grid Project. According to the company, the installation can provide 1 MW for up to an hour and can perform services to increase electric grid operational efficiency, stability and power quality. Lin said he hasn’t anything substantial to report as an update on the Maui system, as they are still in the process of gathering data. In June 2013


The first battery module for The Toronto Community Energy Stor- age project was installed in 2013 and two more are due for instal- lation in 2014.


the company announced that its grid-battery system (GBS) had been rec- ognized as op- erationally and safety-compliant with the Euro- pean Union’s Low Voltage Directive and Electromagnetic Compatibility


Directive. When asked whether this has had an impact on its existing agreement to supply six GBSs to Northern Powergrid in the UK, Lin confirmed that it has. Te GBSs have been designed for peak-load shiſting and to manage fluctuations in voltage on the UK’s power grid. “Tey are located on six separate sites in the UK to support


distribution on the grid,” said Lin. Some are in fairly small containers, have 50–100 kW and all have about two hours of storage on board, so they had to be customized or tailored. Te company is particularly proud of its adaptability. In


some cases there was no space to place an energy storage con- tainer, so an existing building had to be used. “Tere was quite a diversity of packages that were delivered,” said Lin. “Te important point is that we never altered the core solution. We still used the same battery solutions, the same battery racks, the thermal management systems were all similar or the same as those used in other installations. Te company had a flex- ible ‘we can do it’ approach to all the spaces.” All but complete, the project is currently at the “teaching


stage,” preparing to operate the systems before getting them up and running. Te company has a couple of new projects in the pipeline


for 2014, which Lin says will be announced in due course. On January 13, 2014, it announced the completion of a 1–3 MW per hour grid energy system (GSS) in Spain for Red Eléctrica de España (REE), the Spanish transmission system


22 Energy Manufacturing 2014


operator. Te system, which includes power conversion and controls, was installed and commissioned at the Carmona substation near Seville in late December.


EnerDel In 2013 EnerDel completed the commissioning of a 5-MW


energy storage system (ESS) for Portland General Electric’s Salem Smart Power Project (Salem, OR), part of the Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration Project. It comprises five 1-MW systems featuring EnerDel’s SP90-590, which were installed, tested and commissioned on-site in the months prior to commissioning. Te ESS includes 1440 rack-mounted lithium-ion battery


modules monitored by an advanced battery management system supporting a 5-MW inverter array of 20–250 kW/62.5 kW-hr channels rated at 600V DC. Each channel contains an independently operated battery management system connect- ed to a 250-kW inverter. Tis configuration delivers a high level of control, flexibility and safety.


Toronto Hydro Electric Systems Toronto Hydro Electric Systems says it is exploring options


for storage at multiple levels in its distribution system. Te company’s initial focus is on community energy storage, and it is a member of a consortium that secured federal fund- ing from Sustainable Development Canada to install three lithium-ion storage units each of 250 kW/250 kWh. Te first was installed adjacent to a community center in January 2013. Units 2 and 3 will follow in 2014 and 2015. Te consortium has applied for provincial funding under the Smart Grid Fund to enlarge the capacity of the second unit (to 500 kWh). Tis would be installed within a commercial building in downtown Toronto. “In addition,” said Richard Ford, director, Grid Solutions


Engineering at Toronto Hydro, “we are investigating funding opportunities to demonstrate the connection of community energy storage schemes comprised of repurposed EV batter- ies. Te idea is to use the battery to support the connection of a number of DC fast-charging stations for electric vehicles. “Toronto Hydro has also sought to make connection


opportunities available for other storage initiatives within Toronto. Ryerson University is working with Electrovaya to demonstrate a Li-ion battery unit on the Ryerson Campus. Tis will be operational in 2014. Hydrostor plans to connect an offshore compressed air storage system—approximately 1-MW capacity—and connect on the Toronto lakeshore in 2014. Opus 1 is working with the YMCA in Toronto to dem- onstrate a combined PV/EV/storage system at the newly-built YMCA building, which will be part of the athletes’ village in the 2015 Pan Am games.” Although these are not Toronto Hydro-led projects, the company expects to learn from the experience of working closely with all three groups. In addi-


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