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Gear Manufacturing


past, hobbing and chamfering took too much time at the same setting. “We have solved this by integrating a com- plete second machining unit for chamfer cut tools—two machines in one, so to speak,” said Oliver Winkel, director of Application Technology and responsible for technologi- cal development of gearcutting at Liebherr-Verzahntechnik (Kempten, Germany).


Chamfering no longer prolongs machining time because it takes place in a separate unit within the same machine, while the next workpiece is hobbed. “We know from transmission design development that the subject of ‘chamfering’ is becom- ing more and more important. This innovation enables the machine to combine an already undisputed high chamfering quality, provided by the proven Chamfer Cut procedure, with cycle times that correspond to the demands of the automotive industry,” said Winkel.


This technology is not limited to the auto industry. It can be of benefit to any gearmaker whose current procedures are too time-consuming, whose tooling costs are too high, or


those who need to take follow-up processes such as honing into consideration.


Compared to press deburring and chamfering with finger mills, the chamfer cut process has the lowest chamfering costs. Anticipating further downsizing trends in the auto industry, the Liebherr chamfer cutting technology can also generate even smaller, more precise chamfers for transmission compo- nents. As the importance of a reproducibly generated chamfer increases, the smaller the gear will be.


Ghosted image of Liebherr LC 180 Chamfer Cut shows how hobbing and chamfering are integrated in a single unit.


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In the industry, parts frequently do not conform to draw- ings due to imprecise chamfering procedures. “This is espe- cially true the thinner the gear face width becomes,” said Win- kel. “The importance of the transmission designer being able to calculate the limits of design feasibility is increasing, so the chamfer is becoming more and more of an engineering factor. Since its actual impact can now be calculated, its importance also has increased. The ever tighter design of transmissions is one reason why the importance of chamfer quality has increased. It makes a huge difference in the case of a gear from an automotive transmission that is only around 12-mm wide, whether the chamfer is 0.5 or 1 mm—and consistently throughout high-volume production,” said Winkel. —James D. Sawyer, Senior Editor


Cutting Smaller Gears, Faster, Without Quality Loss A Liebherr LC 1200 Gear Hobbing machine resides at Ingersoll Cutting Tools (Rockford, IL), where it demonstrates


See us at BIGM Booth #330 54 ManufacturingEngineeringMedia.com | June 2014


Photo courtesy Liebherr Gear Technology


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