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Energy Innovations


long boring-bar option. Te NT 6600 is a 6-m X-axis machine with a 600-mm chuck size that is well-suited for these applica- tions. Also, the NLX is designed for heavy-duty machining of difficult-to-machine hard metals like stainless and Inconel,” said Chaphalkar. Te NLX 4000 is a rigid four-axis lathe with two turrets that can be used for performing a variety of processes on large tubes. Te NLX is equipped with a tailstock and a big bore spindle for long tubes to be passed through.


of large high-quality components with THK linear guideways on the X axis, and Schneeberger roller linear guideways on the Y axis. X-axis travels range from 85 to 284" (2160–7200 mm) and Y-axis travels range from 55 to 158" (1400–4000 mm). Te Z axis features boxway construction and travel of 35.4" (900 mm) with an optional 47.2" (1200-mm) travel available. Feeler boring mills feature ultra-high precision for machining large workpieces and four-axis capability for work on mul-


“Machine tool rigidity, versatility and accuracy are among the most critical considerations in the manufacture of oil & gas components.”


“For large-diameter parts, the DMU series of machines up


to the DMU 600P with a 6-m X-axis stroke can handle a part with a 4 to 5-m diameter. It’s available in sizes with a 2.4-m X axis or 2.7-m X axis. Tese machines are very flexible and can do turning where needed. Our latest development is making gears on our machines for oil field and energy applications where the parts are long and the setup time is high. Te more operations you can combine on a single setup, the more part handling is reduced and cost savings are improved. Te NT series machines and various DMU models all can cut various types of gears, including everything from helical, spur, herring bone, to bevel gears,” said Chaphalkar.


Machines Built for Challenging Conditions “Machine tool rigidity, versatility and accuracy are among


the most critical considerations in the manufacture of oil & gas components,” said Dale Hedberg, Feeler product manager, Methods Machine Tools Inc. (Sudbury, MA). “Machine tools must be exceptionally strong and rigid to be capable of ac- curately producing large, heavy-duty parts comprised of exotic materials. At the same time, machines should be versatile to perform complex machining required to produce many oil & gas components. Challenging conditions put extreme de- mands on equipment, for example, drillheads that might need to go down two to three miles require high accuracy in order to prevent any failure.” “Machines that are well-suited for the manufacture of oil


& gas components from Methods Machine Tools include the Feeler double-column bridge-style machines that offer the rigidity and strength required to accurately manufacture large, cumbersome components. Te machines also feature a stepped Y-axis beam and weigh up to 82 t, contributing significantly to rigidity. For extra machining power, the Feeler bridge machine’s German ZF gearbox design provides optimal spindle performance and a 4-to-1 gear ratio, for maximum power and torque at lower rpm,” said Hedberg. Te Feeler FV-Series bridge mills facilitate the production


84 Energy Manufacturing 2014


tiple part surfaces. In addition, these systems offer a large 5" (127-mm) quill diameter with 27.5" (698 mm) of travel and linear scales in X, Y and Z axes for precise machining of large components.


Multifunction Machines Fit Various Strategies “Okuma offers a number of multifunction machines for


producing downhole components, some of which [LOC series] are capable of simultaneous four-axis cutting with balanced loads on both turrets,” said Tim Caron, Houston Tech Center Coordinator, Okuma America Corp. (Charlotte, NC). “Te Multus series general-purpose multifunction CNC lathe, for example, is available with a long bed.” When equipped with a subspindle, the machines reduce setup time by virtually eliminating repetitive fixturing. Te Multus B750 with W spindle hands the part from one spindle to the other to complete milling and turning operations without changing the part. Programming of both lathe and machining center processes are handled by the Okuma THINC OSP control with advanced functions like its exclusive Collision Avoidance System soſtware for achieving high accuracy. Multus U series are the newest additions to the Okuma


lineup of multifunction machines. Te Multus U3000 and U4000 provide rigid and thermally stable platforms for turn- ing, milling, through holes, deep drilling contouring, thread- ing and other operations. Optional opposing (W) spindles and an optional lower turret provide flexibility for a wide variety of configurations and parts. Te 240° swing on the B axis pro- vides full machining areas for both the main and subspindles. Te 22-kW output of the U3000’s two-step gear develops a maximum torque of 427 N•m while the speed climbs to 5000 rpm. Y-axis travel up to 9.84" (250 mm) and Z-axis travel up to 63" (1.6 m) in the 1500 version are possible. Te Multus U4000 features a 22-kW output of the two-step gear and develops a maximum torque of 700 N•m; Y-axis travel up to 11.81" (300 mm) and Z-axis travel up to 82.6" (2.1 m) in the 2000 version are possible.


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