This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Overview


investment (EROI). EROI is the ratio of acquired usable energy from a particular source to the amount of energy required to produce this energy. Coal’s high EROI is expected to maintain this elevated level, especially as energy providers improve their systems to minimize the environmental impact of burning thermal coal. Likewise, uranium also maintains high EROI levels, which is expected to help support demand for uranium mining operations. While these commodities can impact the environment, the energy they provide is projected to remain essential to the US energy sector. One of the primary factors influencing the Coal Mining


industry (IBISWorld report 21211) is the increase in domestic natural gas production. However, the US continues to operate with excess electricity generating capacity, as the negative im- pacts of the recession have yet to be fully reversed. Combined with high levels of natural gas production, this excess capacity has placed pressure on the price of natural gas. Furthermore, the increasing environmental focus on coal-powered electric- ity generation is expected to cause natural gas to account for a larger share of total energy consumption. According to the EIA, natural gas is expected to account for 30% of primary energy consumption in the United States in 2040, up from 27% in 2012. Tis increase is expected to come at the expense of petroleum product energy consumption. Nevertheless, coal is expected to constitute a major role in global energy markets over the five years to 2019. IBISWorld


14 Energy Manufacturing 2014


expects that mining machinery manufacturers will continue to offer high value-added products to mining companies during the next five years, especially as environmental con- cerns weigh on downstream sectors. Te high cost of mining operations ensures that demand for improving machinery technology will remain elevated over this period. While the Coal Mining industry is not expected to reach prerecession revenue levels, demand for mining machinery will continue to be strong as mining companies continue to seek ways to lower the high costs of extraction.


Fukushima Daiichi and Uranium Mining Safety is of paramount importance in nuclear power gen-


eration, and the events that took place at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi plant in 2011 brought this issue into the global spot- light. In response to this disaster, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) identified several tiers of requirements, ranging from Tier 1 (highest priority) to Tier 3 (pending the outcome of Tier 1 implementations). Tier 1 requirements include immediate safety enhancements to nuclear plants. Additionally, the nuclear industry has implemented a flexible response strategy known as “FLEX.” Tis strategy is intended to equip nuclear plants with diversely located equipment to ensure flexibility in the case of an emergency. Additionally, the nuclear energy industry has been developing regional critical equipment centers that would be capable of delivering


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200