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Energy Innovations


Framework for Sustainability Te larger framework for


sustainability is to define the problem, system boundary and scope, establish key performance indicators and build tools to assess sustainability, according to Margot Hutchins, associate director, LMAS, at UC-Berkeley. A comprehensive, holistic approach characterizes manufacturing systems fully, assesses important resource flows across all levels of the hierarchy (process, cell, line, facility) and provides analysis of the role of manufacturing in the entire product life cycle. Data captured from appropriate


system flow sensors are best moni- tored concurrently with data from process parameters. Standardized data aid synthesis, support analysis across the hierarchy and enable scaling to large data volumes. Relating key process parameters to environmental impacts (energy and water consumption, wastes generated, CO2


emissions); techni-


cal performance (tool wear, prod- uct quality); and social impacts


like human and labor costs and community health and well-being helps characterize product performance in terms of part features. Tese results are combined into the cost function of resources, services and products to select the pro- cess parameters that optimize the product life cycle, providing new opportunities for optimiza- tion and improvement. See lma.berkeley.edu for


more information. At Briggs & Stratton Corp.


David Dornfeld, professor and director, Lab- oratory for Manufacturing and Sustainabil- ity, University of California-Berkeley, was the other leader of the panel that discussed sustainable manufacturing approaches, standards initiatives and industry solutions.


(Milwaukee) locations through- out the world, sustainability and energy teams are embed- ded as a culture attribute. John Mourand, corporate envi- ronmental and sustainability director, talked about the many lifecycle assessments (LCAs) the company conducts each year to understand the environmental impact of its products—from raw materials extraction and processing, manufacturing and transportation to in-service use through to disposal. In one example, handling


Sustainability panelists (l to r): Margot Hutchins (UC-Berkeley), Sarah Krasley (Autodesk), Michael Overcash (Wichita State), John Mourand (Briggs & Stratton) and Karen Huber (Caterpillar).


78 Energy Manufacturing 2014


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