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Grinding


smooth, fast and accurate positioning and grinding of PCD tools," said Stolmar. EWAG’s fi ve-axis Compact Line, for example, features a direct-drive spindle and linear motor technology for grinding indexable inserts, including carbide, CBN, and PCD. The Compact Line is capable of untended operation over several shifts because of an integrated six-axis FANUC 200i-C robot and a “three-in-one” dressing, regeneration, and crushing unit that assures the grinding wheel is always near perfect. The compact design and linear motors also minimize non- grinding times and ensure the shortest possible cycle times. The plug-and-play HSK-E63 clamping system enables fast and precise changeover between different types of clamping systems needed to manufacture a wide range of inserts and similar tools. Automatic 3D probing measures all workpiece features in one clamping.


“Machines engineered with a focus on grinding hard ma- terials have systems to measure and control grinding pres-


sure to protect the tool’s cutting edge from sudden changes in grinding forces. On-machine measurement capability, usually in the form of touch probes, is essential to ascertain the location of the tool before grinding and to then confi rm that the desired results have been achieved,” said United Grinding’s Stolmar.


Grinding a diamond tool with a diamond wheel pits two similarly hard materials against each other. When a lot of excess material has to be removed from the tool, wear on the diamond wheel can result in frequent wheel dressing and replacement. In some cases, an electrical discharge machining (EDM) or spark erosion process can be a cost-effective alternative. For machining with the noncontact EDM process, the PCD


tool’s metal binder provides the required electrical conductivity. EDM is accomplished using a wire electrode or a solid tung- sten-copper disk (referred to as electrical discharge grinding or EDG). “EDM can be used to rough-cut the tool geometry, and then a diamond grinding wheel provides the fi nal fi nish for


biomedical diagnostics For more information and how to apply, visit dcu.asu.edu


International School of Biomedical Diagnostics


86 ManufacturingEngineeringMedia.com | June 2014


be on the edge of


Announcing the international Master of Science in Biomedical Diagnostics program available Fall 2014. This unique program is based on Dublin City University’s (DCU) award-winning Master of Science in Biomedical Diagnostics. It was developed by Arizona State University, DCU and Ventana Medical Systems, combining the strengths of these world-renowned academic institutions and industry leader. The program utilizes new technology-enabled collaborations to explore the science, business, technology and application of diagnostics. It blends face-to-face and online courses to position graduates on the cutting-edge of this innovative field.


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