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orlando


“60 percent of the women in our shelter tell us that they had a pet that’s either been injured or killed by their abuser,” said Harbor House CEO Carol Wick. “When they decide to flee, we don’t want them to have to make a decision as to their safety and their pets.” The fourth annual Paws For Peace walk was held in April at Blue Jacket Park to help support the pets at Harbor House of Central Florida. More than 300 canine and human walkers took part in the walk, raising more than $23,000. All of the proceeds benefited survivors and their pets who find a safe haven at Harbor House. The Paws for Peace Kennel is a 1500 square foot kennel located at the undisclosed address of Harbor House Emergency Shelter. It is a state-of-the-art facility that serves as a national model for on-site kenneling at domestic violence shelters. HarborHouseFl.com


(Above): Lulu is ready to go. (Near right): Caleb and Zoe resting after the Paws For Peace walk. Photography by Christine Webb.


Signs like these were displayed throughout the walk. Photography by Christie Zizo.


saint petersburg


Ease on down the road.The 29th Annual American Stage in the Park production was The Wiz. For a couple of the evening’s shows, dogs were allowed to attend during Pets in the Park Night. Their favorite part of the show was not when the flying mon- keys appeared. Nay, it was when the fair Daisy, a Wire Fox Terrier appeared on stage as Dorothy’s dog, Toto. The outdoor production took place in Demens Landing Park, on the waterfront in St. Petersburg.


(Top - left to right): Koko, an eight-year-old Yorkie. Konika, an eight-year-old “pretty awesome rescue,” dressed as a Flying Monkey. Daisy, finding her mark on stage. (Bottom - left to right): Sebastian, a three-year- old Corgi. Dexter, an English Yellow Labrador. Tail gating during Pets in the Park night.


(Left): We ran into The Barker Brigade Dog Club, a group of dog-loving residents living at Terrace Park of Five Towns in St. Petersburg. They get together every month to talk about, what else? Their dogs. That’s exactly what Dan Fiorini told us (shown here with his dog Rolf Pierre and Jill, dressed as the Cowardly Lion. We’re wondering if the dog club would consider re-naming their organization The New Barker Brigade Dog Club.


84 THE NEW BARKER www.TheNewBarker.com


Photography by Anna Cooke.


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