This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Healing Waters. –by Anna Cooke


Drawing initially from the documented success in human phys- ical therapy, hydrotherapy was one of the earliest modalities to be integrated with veterinary medicine. Inventions to provide hydrotherapy to animals as large as horses appeared as early as


2004, Tampa Bay K-9 Rehabilitation Center was the first, full- service canine rehabilitation center in the Tampa Bay Area. In Orlando, Hip Dog Canine Hydrotherapy & Fitness is


Central Florida’s first and oldest canine hydrotherapy facility. The actor, Tom Nowicki, whose film credits include The Blind Side, The Punisher, Remember the Titans and Dolphin Tale, first opened the facility back in 2000. The screened-in outdoor saltwater swimming pool is kept at a constant 88 degrees. Hip Dog is now owned by Beverly and Peter McCartt who offer one-on-one therapy sessions for dogs recovering from surgery, or who are disabled. Athletic dogs come for fitness training, such as resistance training to help build core muscles for sports like flyball competition. Working closely with the veterinary com-


munity, dogs are required to have veterinary clearance before swimming at Hip Dog. Pre- and post-operative dogs are required to have veterinary referral in order to facilitate and coordinate proper recovery management. All swim lessons are specifically tailored to each dog. The location of Hip Dog Canine


Hydrotherapy is an unassuming one. It sits on the edge of a Winter Park residential neighbor- hood, and could be mistaken as just another house. But, step inside the gated area, and a feel- ing of spiritual tranquility takes over. There is a calming energy that exudes from both Beverly and Peter. Human guests are immediately put at ease. Dogs are expected to be, just dogs. “It is sheer joy to be in the water with the


animals. I am reminded about this every single day,” said Beverly. “I am fascinated by the open- ness that our clients have when talking about their dogs. Oftentimes, what they reveal about their homelife helps us better understand the needs of the dog.”


the 19th century. Veterinarians today continue to gain confi- dence in hydrotherapy through performing scientific case stud- ies on animals, comparable to those performed on humans, and by observing similarly positive results. Dr. Mark Brown of Central Animal Hospital incorporates


hydrotherapy as part of recovery for injured and post surgical dogs. Tampa Bay K-9 Rehabilitation Center is a 500 square foot facility located at the Hospital. The equipment at the Center includes an underwater treadmill and swim tank. Dr. Brown is one of only a handful of veterinarians in Florida who is a Certified Canine Rehabilitation Practitioner. Established in


54 THE NEW BARKER Noel, a 12-year-old Corgi had canine degenerative


myelopathy, a progressive disease of the spinal cord in older dogs. It begins with a loss of coordination (ataxia) in the hind limbs. The affected dog will wobble when walking, fall over or drag her feet. By the time Noel came to Hip Dog, she was los- ing the mobility in her back legs. “The prognosis of this disease is always grim,” said Beverly.


“We cannot stop this disease, but we can provide comfort and help keep the muscles strong. Noel’s humans wanted to do whatever necessary to ensure that she had a good quality of life. To that end, we feel fortunate to have been a part of that.”


www.TheNewBarker.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104