This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
editor unleashed


Bajougy, one of several illustrations by John Burgoyne, created for Dog Songs, a book of poems by Mary Oliver. Burgoyne has done many illustrations for Cook’s Illustrated. We are honored to showcase his work here. See the book review on page 43.


Anna with her pack Zoe, Chloe, Dougie and Rita.


The mood ring was created in the 1970’s by Josh Reynolds and Maris Ambats. Humans are adept in hiding their feelings, so Josh and Maris must have thought we needed a visual tool to indicate our state of being. The color of the ring on the wearer alerted others to one’s approacha- bility. Adjectives used in marketing the ring to describe one’s mood according to its color, included irritable, melancholy, cuddly, amorous and (the offensive) frigid. Around 2004, Michele Levan thought


we needed a way to tell how our dogs were feeling and created the mood collar. The color of the stones on the collar worn by the dog would change according to the dog’s body temperature, giving humans an indication of how their dogs were feeling. While we may self-assuredly believe


we can hide our feelings from one another, canines are known for their accurate judgment of character, in both their species and ours. They are natural born observers. Of the four dogs in our home,


Dougie, the Scottish Terrier appears to have the most demonstrative (and endear- ing) reactions to the moods of his humans. During a particularly over- whelming moment recently, I sat down on the steps in our home and put my head in my hands. Dougie was the only dog who quietly walked up to sit by my side. And, he didn’t just sit next to me. He gently leaned into me to let me know he was there. When I lifted my head, he licked my face, looked into my eyes and placed his head firmly into my chest. He remained that way for the few minutes he thought his services were required. Then, as if to say, “Okay, I think you need a break,” he jumped up, wagged his tail and ran to the door. Best therapy in the world. Dogs can tell what mood we’re in, and react differently, according to the


6 THE NEW BARKER


moods they have previously observed in their humans. They also give off very real signs that indicate their own moods. If we make ourselves aware, their body language will clue us in. Perhaps it’s the tail that is a dog’s greatest mood indicator of all. Dominant dogs often carry their tails


rigidly high and may bristle the hair on the tail upon meeting a new dog, to show their status as top dog. Confident dogs are generally relaxed about their tails and carry them more according to mood. In these dogs, the tail may be up or down, wagging or not, depending on the situation. In contrast, fearful or insecure dogs will clamp their tails tightly against their rumps. The tail as a gauge of intensity might


be seen when a dog at play suddenly stops to concentrate on a bird. The tail is held stiffly straight out at the level of the back. When he is happy, Dougie’s upright


tail wags back and forth. The speed depends on the source of his happiness (human, food, toy, dog). When he is on the hunt for a lizard, his tail twirls around like a whirligig. In George Romane’s final book,


Mental Evolution in Animals (1893), he attempted to relate animal instinct and animal intelligence to evolution, using the notes on animal behavior from his friend, Charles Darwin. “The emotional life of the dog is highly developed, more highly, indeed, than that of any other animal,” wrote Romane. Of course, dogs have feelings, and


they aren’t afraid to show them. Can any other creature convey utter dejection better than a dog when told he is not going outside for a walk? Can anything be more happy than a joyous dog, when told he is?


signals the start of something fun. Happy wagging.


A dog’s tail never lies. But, it often U


www.TheNewBarker.com


Photo by Laura Allen Studios.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104