This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Prevent Dementia


Caregivers for parents or other rela- tives with Alzheimer’s or other forms of dementia are often concerned about experiencing such regression them- selves. “There is some evidence that a tendency to memory loss can be inherited, but in any case, there are things you can do to prevent and even possibly reverse memory loss,” coun- sels Noodleman.


Reducing stress is the best way to keep a sharp mind, she says. “Chronic stress inhibits the cerebral cortex (the brain’s gray matter, responsible for higher mind function, including mem- ory), resulting in a lack of judgment and other impaired brain function. So, manage stress and memory function will improve.”


Deep breathing and increased oxygenation of the blood helps relieve stress and deliver nutrients to brain cells. Practicing yoga postures like the shoulder stand and headstand, or exercises using an inversion table, for just a few minutes a day can improve circulation to the brain and may help keep brain cells intact.


“It’s important to keep brain cells healthy and alive by keeping blood sugars and blood pressure under control,” urges Doctor of Osteopathy Lisa Ganghu, an internal medicine specialist and clinical assistant profes- sor at New York University’s Langone Medical Center, in New York City. High blood pressure and diabetes are risk factors for strokes and mini-strokes that result in brain cell impairment, she says, adding, “Some research even suggests that caffeine may improve memory and focus.” “Use it or lose it,” concludes


Dr. Jacob Teitelbaum, an integrative medical authority from Kona, Hawaii, and author of Real Cause, Real Cure. Extensive research shows that chal- lenging the brain with puzzles and language courses, having an active social life and getting regular exercise are all related to maintaining optimum brain health.


“People who age gracefully are physically and mentally active,” adds Noodleman.


natural awakenings May 2013 15


Prevent Disease A proper diet is a good place to start to take control. Ganghu recommends largely plant-based diets, like the Medi- terranean, to keep common repercus- sions of aging at bay. Teitelbaum contravenes traditional medicine’s stance and says that most people don’t need to worry about salt intake, even if they suffer from high blood pressure, noting, “Research shows that people that follow the na- tional guidelines for salt intake tend to die younger. Instead, it’s important to keep magnesium and potassium levels up by adding 200 milligrams of magne- sium and 500 milligrams of potassium to your supplement regimen every day.” To prevent and control diabetes,


Teitelbaum emphasizes, “Avoid sugar; it causes premature cell aging that affects all body systems.” He explains that ex- cess sugar and its byproducts age and stiffen cells. Dozens of studies directly link sugar and aging, including a PLoS Genetics study from the University of Montreal. (Also see Tinyurl.com/ GlycationExplained.)


Reproducing cancer cells typically don’t die as other cells in the human body are programmed to. Recent re- search by Baylor University and others based on the Human Genome Project strongly suggests that curcumin taken as a dietary supplement (400 mg a day or more) can persuade cancer cells to commit suicide and stop their wild and potentially fatal reproduction. Ganghu further recommends limiting exposure to environmental toxins from sources such as common garden and household chemicals and agricultural spraying (choose organic for safety).


Weight Control A large body of research from institu- tions such as the National Institute on Aging and the International Longevity Center shows that avoiding obesity and managing weight is paramount for lon- gevity, as well as for preventing many of the diseases associated with aging. The Centers for Disease Control and Preven- tion reports that people with a body mass index (BMI) over 35 are at an 18


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48