This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Register online at www.esalen.org or by calling 888-8-ESALEN (888-837-2536).


instructions given before and after each session. Leader instructions point out the desired state, the way to attain it, and how to correct the prob- lems that typically occur at each stage of medita- tion practice. Practice is followed carefully and instructions are individualized for each student. Enrollment is limited to thirty-six participants, with first priority given to individuals who have not taken this retreat before. Participants must attend all sessions.


Please bring a meditation cushion, if you would like to use one.


CE credit for MFTs and LCSWs; see page 113. CE credit for nurses; see page 113.


Daniel Brown is an associate clinical professor of psy- chology at Harvard Medical School. He is author of 13 books, including Transformations of Consciousness (with Ken Wilber and Jack Engler) and Pointing Out the Great Way: The Stages of Meditation in the Mahamudra Tradition.


George Protos has studied the “pointing-out” style of meditation with Daniel Brown since 1995. He leads weeklong retreats and an ongoing meditation study group in Marin County, Calif., and created an online user support group for meditators.


Gokhale Method® Esther Gokhale


Teacher Training


The Gokhale Method uses kinesthetic, visual, intellectual, aesthetic, and technological cues to gently guide students back to the way they moved when they were children—the same way their hunter gatherer ancestors moved. Gokhale Method teacher training teaches the craft of restoring primal architecture and movement patterns. Using high-touch and high-tech tools, teachers guide their students in relearning the daily movements of life. By mastering powerful, basic techniques such as stretchsitting, stacksit- ting, stretchlying, tallstanding, hip-hinging and glidewalking, Gokhale-trained teachers are able to help their students get to the postural root of most back, neck, hip, knee, foot, and shoulder problems. Through observation and hands-on experience with real cases, study of relevant anatomy, and instruction in use of databases, apps, and class blogs, teachers learn to use both ancient wisdom and state-of-the-art technology to facilitate life-changing experiences. They learn to be eloquent with their hands, perceptive with their eyes, and compelling with their voic-


es. When they graduate, Gokhale Method teach- ers are proficient in presenting introductory classes, doing initial consultations, and teaching the six-lesson Gokhale Method Foundations course to small groups and individual students.


Prerequisite: Students must have already complet- ed a Gokhale Method Foundations course.


Note: There are additional requirements to be completed after the teacher training week at Esalen before a teacher is qualified to teach the Gokhale Method. Please see www.egwellness.com for full details.


Note: Registration for this workshop is through the Gokhale Method Institute only. To register, go to www.egwellness.comor contact teachertrain- ing@egwellness.com. Only after you have regis- tered with the Gokhale Method Institute and paid tuition fees will you be able to reserve accommodations at Esalen. Please see accom- modations costs under “Pricing for Partner Programs” at www.esalen.org/workshops/ reservations.html.


CE credit for bodyworkers; see page 113. CE credit for nurses; see page 113.


Leader bio on page 46.


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KODIAK GREENWOOD


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