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ing themes in your relationship and provide tools to deal with them before they become terminal problems. It will also provide tools for experiencing heightened aliveness, sus- taining a sense of self in the body, making sex better, and an opening to existential/spiritual themes of intimacy and aging. With IBP, cou- ples can learn how to regain their hope and excitement.


Please note: This workshop is for couples only.


Recommended reading: Rosenberg & Morse, The Intimate Couple; Rosenberg, Rand & Asay, Body, Self, and Soul; Rosenberg, Total Orgasm.


CE credit for MFTs and LCSWs; see page 113.


Jack Lee Rosenberg is in private practice in Venice, Calif. Founder and clinical director of the Rosenberg- Kitaen Integrative Body Psychotherapy Central Institute and the 12 IBP International Institutes, he authored Total Orgasm and coauthored Body, Self, and Soul and The Intimate Couple.


Beverly Kitaen Morse is a marriage and family therapist in private practice in Santa Monica, Calif., and executive director of the Rosenberg-Kitaen Integrative Body Psychotherapy Central Institute and the 12 IBP International Institutes. She is coauthor of The Intimate Couple.


Taoist Chi Kung: Enhancing Vitality Share Lew & Juanita Lew


tionship. Yet, unless our bodies are awakened, these remain elusive ideas rather than familiar body feelings. Until we recognize the themes that distort our views, cause our prejudgments, and perpetuate old defensive patterns, it is diffi- cult to trust or be trusted. For a conscious rela- tionship, or even just one that works well over time, we must know ourselves and have practi- cal body-mind mental health tools to resolve the inevitable dilemmas that interrupt our sense of wellbeing.


Today, most couples want an equal and recipro- cal relationship, but few know how to accom- plish this attunement of partnership. Once you simultaneously experience the internal feeling of self and attunement with your partner—and know what gets in the way—you will know how you got there and how to achieve it again and again.


Designed as a preventive model, this work- shop can help you uncover the key undermin-


Master Lew, a monastery-trained Taoist priest from southern China, will introduce traditional Taoist concepts of health, longevity, and harmo- ny with nature. The core of the workshop will be instruction in the Shen, a set of twelve Chi Kung exercises (six standing, six sitting) whose primary purpose is self-healing. These rare exer- cises can also help develop better concentration, increase visual and auditory acuity, and enhance sensitivity to oneself and others. Master Lew will tell stories from his Taoist practice as well as his life in the monastery. Master Lew, now nine- ty-four, was among the first to openly teach Chi Kung (Taoist internal energy cultivation) to non-Chinese. His monastery style, Tao Ahn Pai, dates back 1300 years to Lui Dong Bin of the Tang Dynasty, who is one of the Eight Immortals of Taoism.


Recommended reading: Wong, The Pocket Tao; Feng, Tao Te Ching.


CE credit for nurses; see page 113. CE credit for bodyworkers; see page 113.


Leader bios on page 58.


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KODIAK GREENWOOD


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