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See pages 110-111 for reservations, fees, accommodations, scholarship information, and discounts.


The Upledger Institute since 1984. A practitioner of Visceral Manipulation since 1987 and a teacher since 1994, she teaches and speaks internationally for the Barral Institute.


Gestalt Awareness Practice Christine Price


The Way, when declared Seems thin and so flavorless. Nothing to look at, nothing to hear— And when used—is inexhaustible.


—Lao Tzu


Gestalt Awareness Practice is a form—nonanalyt- ic, noncoercive, nonjudgmental—derived from the work of Fritz Perls, influenced by Buddhist practice, and evolved by Richard and Christine Price. The work integrates ways of personal clearing and development that are both ancient and modern. To the extent that awareness is made primary relative to action, Gestalt Awareness Practice has a strong relationship to some forms of meditation. This form is similar to some Reichian work as well, in that emotion-


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al and energetic release and rebalancing are allowed and encouraged.


The emphasis is intrapersonal rather than inter- personal. Participants are not patients but per- sons actively consenting to explore in aware- ness. The leader functions to reflect, clarify, and respect whatever emerges in this process. The aim is unfoldment, wholeness, and growth, rather than adjustment, cure, or accomplish- ment. The workshop will utilize group exercises, meditations, and discussion. The format com- bines introductory group work with the open seat form, in which each participant will have the opportunity to work with the leader in a group context.


Please note: Meeting times for this workshop are longer than the average Esalen workshop.


Recommended reading: Perls, Gestalt Therapy Verbatim; Chodron, The Wisdom of No Escape.


CE credit for MFTs and LCSWs; see page 113. CE credit for nurses; see page 113.


Leader bio on page 11.


Yoga and Addiction Recovery: A Celebration of Healing


Nikki Myers, Noah Levine & Rolf Gates


Join us as we bring together the ancient tools and practices of yoga and meditation as a way to deepen the exploration of recovery from addic- tions. The leaders represent a wide variety of backgrounds and modalities in this dynamic field. They gather to share their experience, strength, and hope through the journey from addiction to recovery.


Addictive behaviors separate us from ourselves, each other, our environment, and the Divine. Yoga offers us a set of practices that directly address the range of issues caused by the family disease of addiction. Connected to our whole- ness, we more readily recognize our addictive behaviors and find the inner strength to move beyond them. Through this retreat experience, we will connect our inner and outer worlds and awaken the joy and peace from within by learning how to bring recovery alive in our practice.


DOUG ELLIS


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