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Upper Crust AJAY VIJ


From a kitchen trainee to an executive chef to food and beverages manager, he was an intrinsic part of the hotel circuit. But after 10 years, he says: “I knew I had capped my further growth in this segment.” Instead of getting steadily more fed up with the limited options available to him, Vij reassessed his skills.


As a graduate from the Oberoi School of Hotel Management, he had not just learnt how to whip up a souffle, he knew all about managing the flaming tempers and sim- mering resentments that form a part of any kitchen.


And so, from The Oberoi in Bangalore, he moved into the infotech sector as head of tech support at Talisma, a software solutions firm, in Bangalore. The only real investment Vij made in his career was the time and ef- fort spent studying management. This has paid rich dividends; today, Vij is a senior vice-president at Accenture, a technology


services company. He maintains that he did not make the career shift for monetary gains; he simply did not want to be stuck in a rut.


Ajay Vij you may not know…..


What are the best and the worst things about be- ing Ajay Vij? Believes in enjoying life and not investing enough time in what he really wants to do.


Global leader / entrepreneur you admire most. Sunil Mittal- forward looking and risk taker


Favourite luxury brand. Mont Blanc


Favourite Golf Palyer. Rory Mcilroy Favourite Music Band / Musician. Nusrat Fateh Ali Khan


Favourite holiday destination. Many- Kabini is the most visited and closest to home


GIREM 101 49


Favourite cuisine. Home style Country Cuisine – preferably Mediter- ranean


Which city best reflects ‘Urban India’ Relatively speaking, Hyderabad.


What’s the first thing that comes to your mind when I say, ‘India in 2020’ Leader of the pack- respected global player


Most challenging portfolio that you ever handled in your professional life. My days as a Chef at the Oberoi’s- each day was exciting.


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