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Corporate Security


port involves a lot of inherent problems like mileage misman- agement, misuse of cabs, break- ing of traffic laws by drivers, car breakdown & accidents, as well as threats from external sources like carjacking, tailing and har- assment, which are beyond the organizations direct control.


Executive Protection The most basic goal of any protec-


tive detail is to avoid / reduce haz- ards These hazards could result from intentional human actions, natural disasters, accidents or even medical conditions For each type of hazard, or specific hazard, there will be some obvious, and some less obvious, strategies for mitigating the hazard. Once the FM knows exactly what he or she is dealing with, FM can go ahead and begin eliminating the haz- ards.


Criminal Record


Event Security In light of the current global


security environment, the overall threat in India has become more real than before. India is a soft target for religious and politically motivated terrorism. Some coun- tries and communities see India primarily as an ally of the USA and with India housing some of the biggest American corporate play- ers in the world there is reason enough to fear that India will get caught in the backlash.


Three Tier System FM should stricture a security


solutions for event security based on a ‘three tier’ system to break the security mechanism into external, internal and core. This allows FM to divide responsibility and accountability which results in greater control and less chanc- es for variances.


Verification Employee verification and back- ground check service providers serve large corporations and ITES/BPO organizations with vital information. FM should ensure the CRV is set as a mandate to all service providers employees housed in the facility.


Approach Based on the recent incidents in


Mumbai, Facility Managers have to devise a build/operate security programme to take control of the security needs. This programme runs from the early process es- tablishment phase, through to implementation and then to day to day operation.


Build • Provide country risk reports


• Expatriate information • Political, social and environmen- tal assessment.


• Review facility plans to provide suitable security recommenda- tions


• Supply, install and service secu- rity hardware/surveillance


• Sanitize and secure the facility during risk


• Identify, recruit and train and monitor a security service pro- vider


• Recruit and train a security manager


Operate • Develop security policy and


procedures


• Security audits (ongoing) • VIP protection and facilitation • Contingency planning for evac- uation, fire, natural disaster and bomb threats


•Monthly, weekly and daily risk reports


•Vendor auditing programs • Assist in development of brand protection program


• Promote awareness of brand protection issues among man- agement and employees


• Develop IT and proprietary information technology protec- tion programmes


To conclude Facility Manager should advocate a strategic ap- proach to risk management and security. To adequately and ap- propriately protect a company’s hard and soft assets enterprise- wide, a security and risk manage- ment strategy must be aligned with the overall business drivers and strategic objectives . It should provide the company with a com- petitive advantage in that it adds flexibility and resilience to the company’s operations and invest- ments while often lowering costs and improving quality.


GIREM 101 27


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