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Dancing WITH BLISS! K IRSTEN MENEGHELLO


As children, we used to experience bliss on an almost daily basis. We were in touch with true joy and happiness when climbing a tree, watching a butterfly, digging in the dirt or running in the playground. We didn’t think about bliss because we lived it.


Bliss can be defined as perfect happiness, serene joy, or ecstasy. It’s a moment when you feel suspended in time and want to sa- vour that wonderful experience. With the demands and schedules of adulthood, how often do you experience bliss in your daily life? Tink about the last time you felt truly blissful. Perhaps it was on vacation when you were able to step outside of your re- sponsibilities. Maybe you were lying on the beach, hearing the sound of the crashing waves or watching a sunset.


I recently recaptured the feeling of bliss when I reconnected with what I loved most as a child: dancing. My love of dance started when I was a toddler; I loved music so much that I would stand next to the radio to sing and dance along for what seemed like hours on end. I would watch Dance Fever on TV and copy all the dance moves. Once, as I was perfecting a particular move, I slid across the living room and slammed my chin into the coffee table. It wasn’t a particularly fun trip to the emergency room for stitches, and


the small scar is still there to this day, more than thirty years later. But that experience did not lessen my love of dance.


As I grew, I started tap dancing lessons then transitioned into ballet. I became very seri- ous about dancing and earned my first set of pointe shoes in middle school. I continued to watch Fame, American Bandstand, Soul Train, and Solid Gold in order to improve my skills. I loved the feeling of extending my body long and lean while en pointe. Tere was no other feeling like it. I loved the discipline and the constant drive toward perfection, coupled with the artistic expres- sion.


I wanted to pursue dancing as a career and had an opportunity to attend a high school for the artistically talented. But my parents did not support my dreams. Tey said it was not prudent to pursue a career as a dancer and pushed me to go to college and law school instead.


In high school, I stopped taking ballet be- cause I knew I was not going to become a professional dancer. And although I danced in clubs and at home occasionally, for the most part I closed that chapter of my life. While trying to stay fit as an adult, I joined a gym and did the ‘workout’ thing: lifted


62 INSPIRATIONAL WOMAN MAGAZINE


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