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Safety First


Know Clearance Before Moving Big Equipment


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• Map your course.Drive the route you'll travel and note the location of all overhead power lines—even the ones that look like they’re too high to cause a problem.


• Choose a road less traveled. Making the move is risky enough when just the driver and a helper are involved. Don’t put others at risk if you don’t have to.


• Call Kiwash Electric and any other electric utilities with lines you might pass underneath. The utility can measure your load — including the bed it’s lying on — and then measure the distance from the ground to the lowest hanging wire. Never measure the line clearance yourself; getting close enough for an accurate measurement puts you at risk of electrocution.


■ coming up


Cordell Pumpkin Festival • October 11, 2014 Downton Cordell


Herald the arrival of autumn, shop arts and crafts booths, sample yummy food, and enjoy fun activities for the whole family. Don’t miss it!


hildren aren’t the only ones who need to play it safe around electric lines. Farmers and others moving


grain bins and large equipment should be sure their load will clear an overhead line before trying to drive under it.


Kiwash Electric Cooperative offers this advice for anyone preparing to move large objects:


• Don’t drive under the line until the utilit says it’s safe.


• Never touch any line with your hands or with any object --even a wooden one. Most utility lines are uninsulated and will burn or shock anyone who comes in contact with them.


• Abide by safet regulations. Once you get a grain bin to its new home, remember that the National Electrical Safety Code requires it to be located at least 18 feet from overhead lines. Better yet, contact Kiwash Electric's engineering department before your move for advice on safely moving and locating your grain bin. If a grain bin is not located a safe distance from power lines, Kiwash may be unable to provide service.


For more information, please call 888-832-3362.


Stuffed Jack-O-Lantern Bell Peppers


INGREDIENTS 6 bell peppers, any color 1 pound ground beef 1 egg


4 slices whole wheat bread, cubed 1 small onion, chopped 1 small tomato, diced 2 cloves garlic, minced 1/2 cup chili sauce 1/4 cup prepared yellow mustard 3 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon pepper


DIRECTIONS Preheat oven to 350°F.Grease an 8x8 inch baking dish.


Lightly mix together the ground beef, egg, bread cubes, onion, tomato, garlic, chili sauce, mustard, Worcestershire sauce, salt, and pepper in a bowl.


Wash the peppers, and cut jack-o’-lantern faces into the pep- pers with a sharp paring knife, making triangle eyes and noses, and pointy-teeth smiles. Slice off the tops of the peppers, and scoop out the seeds and cores. Stuff the peppers lightly with the beef stuffing, and place them into the prepared baking dish so they lean against each other.


Bake in the preheated oven until the peppers are tender and the stuffing is cooked through and juicy, about 1 hour.


Yield: Makes 6 peppers. SOURCE: ALLRECIPES.COM


Sentinel Town and Country Bazaar • November 7-8, 2014 Sentinel Area Activity Center, East of Sentinel on Hwy 55.


Grab a friend and make a trip to Sentinel for a little early Christmas shopping. Sentinel’s Town and Country Bazaar offers two days of fun and a choice of handmade crafts including quilts, jewelry, clothing. purses and more.There’ll be plenty of homemade foods to choose from, too, including pies, cookies, and other baked goods.


Kilowatt | OCTOBER 2014 | 4


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