This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Board of Trustees Bob Usry, President Verle Barnes, Vice Pres.


James “Jim” Martin, Sec.-Treas. John Jensen, Asst. Sec.-Treas. Mike Argo


Percy Moreu Rusty Grissom Ronnie Grover Frank Wilson


District 8 7 9 6 1 2 3 4 5


Oklahoma Electric Cooperative 321-2024, FAX 405-217-6900 http://www.okcoop.org OECNews@okcoop.org


Co-op Manager .............................Max Meek Editor .........................................Brianna Wall


Oklahoma Electric Co-op News is


published monthly by Oklahoma Electric Cooperative, 242 24th Ave. NW, Norman, OK 73069, (USPS-865-700). Subscription rates: $6.00 per year for non-members, 50¢ per year for members. Periodical postage paid at Norman, OK and other additional mailing offi ces. POSTMASTER: Please send form 3579


to: Oklahoma Electric Co-op News, PO Box 1208, Norman, OK 73070.


From the top MAX MEEK, CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER


Remembering the co-op movement, celebrating its evolution


electricity as recent as the 1930s? T at’s right; While Americans living in large cities had been enjoying the luxury of electricity since the late 1890s, those living in the country were at a large disadvantage. It wasn’t until 1935,


D


Hidden Account Number Worth $125


Each month, OEC will pay $25 to the


co-op member who locates his or her hidden account number inside the Co-op News that month. (T e hidden account number will be placed at random within the text of each issue and not on the mailing label.) Unclaimed prize money rolls over each month until there is a winner. Remember the contest rules as you read


the Co-op News each month: 1. T e Hidden Account Number must be your own. 2. You must advise OEC by phone, mail or in person at the co-op’s offi ce by the 15th of the month.


If you fi nd your account number call the Member Services department at 217-6708.


id you know only one percent of U.S. farms and rural homes had access to


when President Franklin Roosevelt signed the Rural Electrifi cation Act, that farmers began electrifying the countryside themselves using federal loans. You see, the cooperative movement began in politics. As former National Rural Electric Cooperative Association CEO—and Cordell, Okla. native—Glenn English said, “Our program was born in politics, and if it dies, it will die in politics.” T is is why we encourage all members to make their voices heard in regards to potential legislation that could aff ect electric bills. Since OEC’s inception in 1937,


“ “


we have grown from a co-op of a few farmers to over 40,000 members. Our mission of providing reliable electricity at an aff ordable cost has not changed in over 75 years. We still


strive each day to meet our evolving membership’s needs, and I believe we have done a fi ne job. T e technology available now and the way we are utilizing it astounds me. We are able to work much more effi ciently, which keeps dollars in your pocket and increases our level of service to you. During the month of


Just like we’ve always


done, we’re keeping members’ interests at the forefront of every


decision we make at OEC.


our members, based on the amount of business done with the co-op. In fact, many of you received your check in the mail in early August. Just like we’ve always done, we’re





keeping members’ interests at the forefront of every decision we make at OEC. T at’s the co-op way.


October, deemed National Cooperative Month by the National Cooperative Business Association, we’re celebrating the unique facets of the co-op business model—they’re the same as they were decades ago. On page 5, you’ll fi nd a


list of three things that set co-ops apart from other businesses. One of them— my favorite—is the return of profi ts to the members, as opposed to investors living in other states. We call those capital credits; T ey are checks sent directly to you,


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