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PAGE 6 | OCTOBER 2014


Draft dodgers: Weather stripping your home BY AMBER BENTLEY, NRECA T


here is no doubt about it; the cold weather is on its way. Not only is it important to make sure that heating


units are working properly, but members should check their homes to make sure that no heat is escaping.


When the weather turns colder, drafts around windows and doors are constantly letting in cool air. Most people will immediately want to raise their thermostat even higher; however, that will cause more energy use that may be unnecessary. Te best solution is weather stripping. Tis is typically an easy fix that will eliminate energy waste and lead to monthly savings on one’s electric bill.


Sometimes drafts are obvious, and other times the openings are much smaller. Here are two quick ways to recognize where heat may be escaping. For doors, look for daylight between the door and its frame, if even a small amount of light can be seen, weather stripping is a good solution. For windows, place a piece of paper between the sash and the seal, then close it. If the paper can be removed without ripping, this is another area that weather stripping can fix.


Te great news is that weather stripping is easy! Tere is an assortment of materials available (like rubber, foam, metal, etc.) and they are all inexpensive. With the proper supplies, keep the following in mind before beginning: be sure the surface is dry and clean, measure the area more than once for best accuracy, and apply so that strips compress both sides of the window or door.


IMAGE SOURCE: NRECA


To weather strip windows: n Place the stripping between the frame


and the sash.


n Be sure that it compresses the window when shut.


n Check to make sure that the stripping does not interfere with the moving of the window.


To weather strip doors: n Choose the proper sweeps and


thresholds for your door. n Weather-strip the entire door jamb.


n Make sure the stripping meets tightly at both corners.


n Use a thickness that allows for a tight press between the door and the ground, but one that does not make the door difficult to shut.


Roughly half of the energy that your home uses comes from heating and


cooling. So the next time you feel an uncomfortable draft in your home, do not immediately crank up the heat. Check to find out where the draft is coming from and properly weather strip the area. Tis will ultimately save you more energy and more money in the end. n


Amber Bentley writes on energy efficiency issues for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the Arlington, Va.-based service arm of the nation’s 900-plus consumer-owned, not-for-profit electric cooperatives.


LOOKING FOR THESE? Found at the TCEC Annual Meeting on Sept. 4. If these are yours, give us a call at 580-652-2418 to arrange for pick up.


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