This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Joe Tarp named manager of vegetation management


management aſt er 22 years of service to OEC. He takes the place of Joe Osborne, whose career will continue at a fellow electric cooperative. Tarp will now be responsible for


F


OEC’s right-of-way maintenance crews, who keep trees and other vegetation out of power lines to help maintain reliable service. “I seem to have come full circle,”


Tarp said. “I began on a right-of-way crew back in 1992, but I’ve worked on overhead construction for 17 years.


ormer Construction Foreman Joe Tarp has been promoted to manager of vegetation


I’m looking forward to going back to where I started, but in a diff erent position.” Tarp and his family have lived


in the Slaughterville area his entire life. He graduated in 1991 from the University of Oklahoma with a degree in Business Administration and has worked at OEC ever since. “We are confi dent Joe Tarp will


continue to make our right-of-way program one of the best in the state,” said Max Meek, OEC CEO. “We wish Joe Osborne the best of luck in his future endeavors.”


What makes cooperatives unique? Three ways we are set apart


the entity you pay for electricity—nothing more—then this information is for you.


I


CAPITAL CREDITS Unlike investor-owned utilities,


where stockholders receive shares of the profi t, the co-op business model names the consumers as the owners. T is means they are entitled to any profi ts made by the co-op. Since 2009, OEC has paid $21.9


million to our members. T is practice is known as members’ economic participation and is included in the Rochdale Principles—a set of guidelines all cooperatives follow.


t’s National Cooperative Month, and while it may not be marked on your family’s calendar, it is certainly marked on ours. If for you OEC is simply


As a member of an electric cooperative, you are its


owner. Your benefi ts stretch beyond receiving reliable electricity from us. Let’s look at three specifi c ways being a member of a co-op means more than just paying a bill.


ONE MEMBER, ONE VOTE


Possibly the most unique aspect


of a cooperative is its democratically- organized leadership system. Each co-op member receives one vote on offi cial business, contrary to an investor-owned company, where the amount of money invested determines the amount of control each shareholder maintains.


ANNUAL MEETING While OEC’s annual meeting has


evolved into more of a celebration of our members, it does serve a signifi cant purpose. If offi cial co-op business is to be


conducted—for example, a slight change to the by-laws—a fi ve percent quorum of the members must be met before a vote can take place. T is practice was instituted with the formation of the very fi rst electric cooperatives over 75 years ago.


5


CO-OP News


WWW.OKCOOP.ORG


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160