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Powerful Living Learn Your Co-op Structure From the Editor


October is slated National Co-op Month. For Oklahoma’s Electric Cooperatives, this is a time to celebrate the co-op business model and the hardworking pioneers who made the ‘dream’ of electricity a reality for Oklahoma’s rural residents. Since their inception around the 1930s, electric co-ops have evolved to better serve their consumer-members. Through the years, various organiza- tions have been created to support the mission and values of electric cooperatives. This month, in honor of co-op month, OKL brings to you a brief description of a few of these organizations that exist to empower you and your community. Together, and every day, they are powering the needs of new generations.


Anna Politano Managing Editor, Oklahoma Living


Distribution Co-op:


A distribution co-op is an electric coop- erative that purchases wholesale power and delivers it to consumer-members who are the owners of the co-op. A distribution co-op is governed by a member-elected board of directors. As a member-owner, you have an invested interest in your co-op’s affairs. There are 28 distribution cooperatives in Oklahoma.


Generation & Transmission Co-op:


Or, a G&T, as it is commonly known. A G&T is a power-supply cooperative owned by a group of distribution cooperatives. G&Ts generate power or purchase it from other power suppliers. Oklahoma has two G&Ts, Western Farmers Electric Cooperative headquartered in Anadarko, Okla., and KAMO Power based in Vinita, Okla.


National Rural Electric Cooperative Association:


This is a national service organiza- tion based in Arlington, Va., created to represent 900-plus consumer-owned, not-for-profi t electric cooperatives in the United States. To learn more, visit www. nreca.coop


Touchstone Energy Electric Cooperatives:


A national brand for the nation’s electric coopera- tives launched in April 1998. Each electric cooper- ative is autonomous, meaning they are governed by their member-elected board of directors—but in the 1990s co-ops nationwide felt the need to be unifi ed under one name that represents their values. Today, nearly 800 co-ops are under the Touchstone Energy umbrella. To learn more, visit www. touchstoneenergy.com


Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives:


OAEC is a statewide association created and voluntarily supported by local electric distribu- tion and generation/transmission cooperatives in Oklahoma. Commonly called the “Statewide,” OAEC was formed in September of 1942, to collectively perform services which would not be economical or practical for each individual cooperative to perform alone. To learn more, visit www.oaec.coop


Oklahoma Living magazine:


A monthly publication, published by the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives and distrib- uted to co-op members. OKL was established in 1948 to serve as a voice for Oklahoma’s electric cooperatives by supplying information about local co-ops, safe, reliable and affordable electricity as well as Oklahoma’s rural lifestyle. To learn more, visit www.ok-living.coop


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