This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ENERGY Eff iciency


Draft dodgers: Weather stripping your home By Amber Bentley


unit is working properly. However, it is irrelevant if the heat is escaping through unseen cracks in your doors and windows. When the weather turns colder,


W


draſt s around windows and doors are constantly letting in cool air. Most people will immediately want to raise their thermostat even higher; however, that will cause you to use more energy when you don’t necessarily need to. T e best solution is to weather strip your home. T is is typically an easy fi x that will eliminate energy waste and help you save on your monthly electric bill.


ith cold weather right around the corner, it is important to make sure your heating


Sometimes draſt s are obvious, and


other times the openings are much smaller. Below are two quick ways to fi nd out if heat is escaping from your home.  For doors, look for daylight between the door and its frame. If you see even a hint of light in between the two, you need to weather strip that area.


 For windows, place a piece of paper between the sash and the seal then close it. If you can remove the piece of paper from the window without ripping it, you need to weather strip that area as well.


An assortment of inexpensive materials is available, such as rubber,


Amber Bentley writes on energy effi ciency issues for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the Arlington, Va.-based service arm of the nation’s 900-plus consumer-owned, not-for-profi t electric cooperatives.


WHAT WILL I NEED TO WEATHER STRIP DOORS AND WINDOWS? FELT


Stapled, glued or tacked into place.  Cost: Low  Advantages: Easy to install and inexpensive.


 Disadvantages: Low durability. Do not use where exposed to a great deal of moisture. All-wool felt is more durable but very visible.


ROLLED OR REINFORCED VINYL Attached to wood or metal strips.  Cost: Low to moderate  Advantages: Easy to install, various colors to help with visibility, height adjustment on some brands.


 Disadvantages: Can be diffi cult to install and very visible, depending on color chosen.


REINFORCED FOAM


Closed-cell foam attached to wood or metal strips.  Cost: Moderately low  Advantages: Eff ective sealer, rigid, proven to work well.


 Disadvantages: Can be diffi cult to install and very visible.


11


foam and metal. Keep the following in mind before you begin weather stripping:  Be sure the surface is dry and clean;


 Measure the area more than once for best accuracy; and


 Apply so that strips compress both sides of the window or door. Roughly half of the energy your


home uses comes from heating and cooling. Next time you feel an uncomfortable draſt in your home, try troubleshooting to fi nd the location of the draſt and take proper measures to eradicate it. T is will ultimately save you more energy and more money in the end.


WWW.OKCOOP.ORG


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160