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C A N A D I A N April 2014


V SUPPLEMENT TO OKLAHOMA LIVING


Head of Co-op Boards Converse about Potential Consolidation


Talks of a potential consolidation between Canadian Valley Electric Cooperative and Central Rural Elec- tric Cooperative continue between the two boards and management as the Cooperative Finance Corpora- tion completes a feasibility study. Recently, the board of trustees CVEC president and CREC chairman sat down to answer questions about the consolidation.


“At first, there is the unknown and the uncertainty of the different individuals, and you have to develop a trust and a closeness,” said Yates Adcock, CVEC board of trustees president. “By gaining life insight into each other, you realize each other’s strengths and start developing a trust, and communications start opening up.”


Members of both cooperatives were notified in September 2013 that the two boards had entered into dis- cussions about the potential consoli- dation. Since, third-party studies have commenced that include an in-depth analysis of the two cooperatives’


By George


So far we have had four months of winter this season, December, January, February and March, and still may be counting even though we have made the switch to Daylight Saving Time. We have learned a new weather term, at least new to me – the Polar Vortex. Fortu- nately in our area of the nation we have had a few nice warm days scattered in this very cold season, but not so every-


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Watch the entire interview by visiting the Videos page on www.BuildingOurEnergyFutureTogether.com. We will continue to include up-to-date information on the potential consolidation in future issues of Electralite.


rates and financials. The similarities between the two cooperatives are a benefit to the consolidation, said Gary McCune, CREC board of trustees chairman.


“It has been an enjoyable process because of our similarities,” McCune said. “It has been a challenge at


where. I was visiting with a counterpart in Minnesota recently. I asked him how much snow they had gotten this year. He replied, “214 inches.” I asked him how much snow was still on the ground there to which he replied, “220 inches.” It has been cold here, but I plan on limiting my complaining.


Not complaining but we have had a significant amount of very cold weather. Canadian Valley customers exceeded the historical previous peak amount of electric usage this winter even surpass- ing summer time levels. Available


times to get the different personali- ties [of the two boards] together, but it has been about a year and a half that we’ve been through the process to consider all the ramifications it [the consolidation] has to our members, our board and really to a statewide and national level.”


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generating reserve margins throughout the region became very thin. It is a little amusing, especially since nothing really bad happened other than some very high prices, that during this very cold period, the “out of favor” coal-fired generating plants with their piles of coal nearby were the lowest cost and most reliable in meeting those peak electrical demands while the temperatures were in the single digits. While the wind was still blowing, most of the wind generators had to be


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