This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
The net cooling effect of a young, healthy tree is equivalent to 10 room-size air conditioners operating 20 hours a day.


—U.S. Department of Agriculture


by windstorms, heavy snow, or ice loads, and can be more drought resistant than fast-growing trees.


Windbreaks Wind speed creates a


windchill factor making outside air temperatures feel cooler. While a refreshing breeze is desirable during summer heat waves, a fierce cold winter wind is not. A windbreak—a wall of trees


and shrubs—reduces wind speed nearby, saving your home from higher heating costs. It’s best to block wind with a


combination of trees and shrubs with low crowns and foliage which grows close to the ground. When combined with a wall or


fence, windbreaks can deflect and lift wind over a home. Evergreens are ideal as they do not lose their foliage in winter. Photinia, a fast growing, hedge-type evergreen shrub with colorful red tips, is a good option and native to our area. For the best protection, leave


between two to five times the mature height of the tree or shrub between the windbreak and the protected home.


Choose the right tree . . .


No one wants to go through the expense and time installing a tree only to find out it can’t handle Oklahoma heat or winds or is too large for the allotted space. Consulting with a local nursery


or the county extension office is always a good idea. Tey know which specimens grow best in this


area and they can help you design for efficiency and curb appeal.


. . . for the right place. Weather-related events cause


the majority of power outages for OEC—19 percent according to a survey by the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. But vegetation—trees, shrubs, brush—growing too close to power lines and distribution equipment runs a close second causing 15 percent of power interruptions. To “cut back” on potential tree-


related problems, OEC operates an aggressive vegetation management program. Our crews and contractors look for foliage growing under lines, overhanging branches, leaning or other types of “danger” trees that could pull down a power line if they fall and trees that could grow into lines. Te job is never done—by the time crews finish trimming along our more than 5,000 miles of distribution lines, vegetation has started to grow back at the starting point.


Te right tree in the right place


can lower line clearance costs, reduce tree mortality, and result in healthier community forests. Before planting trees in your yard, think about how tall they may grow and how wide their branches may spread. Choose tree varieties with care and plant with power lines in mind.


Sources: Oklahoma Climatological Survey, NRECA, www.okplanttrees.org, Arbor Day Foundation, and Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service.


Choose the Right Tree


A proper landscape plan takes each tree into consideration:


D Height. Will the tree bump into anything when it is fully grown?


D Canopy spread. How wide will the tree grow?


D Is the tree deciduous or coniferous? (Will it lose its leaves in the winter?)


D Form or shape. A columnar tree will grow in less space. Round and V-Shaped species provide the most shade.


D Growth rate. How long will it take the tree to reach its full height? Slow growing species typically live longer than fast growing ones.


D Soil, sun, and moisture requirements.


D Fruit. No one wants messy droppings on busy sidewalks.


D Hardiness zones. The temperature extremes in which a tree can be expected to grow.


OEC’s service area is in the USDA Plant Hardiness Zone 7a and our AHS Plant Heat Zone is 8. Plants and trees in our area need to be able to survive below freezing temperatures in winter as well as 100 degree summer temperatures.


April 2014 News Magazine 9


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204