This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Returning to Oklahoma, Lance went to work in the oil fi elds until his brother, who wanted to move to Stillwater with his family, asked him if he was interested in buying the restaurant. The restaurant had been in his family for 57 years and, Lance says, “I didn’t want to see it go anywhere else.”


So, in 2010, Lance became the owner of the


Polly Anna. His philosophy: “We’ve been doing everything from scratch for 60 years. I don’t want to change that.” When Lance says “everything,” he means “ev- ery thing.” Rolls, noodles and desserts are all homemade. All the salad dressings are made from scratch, too. The onions are hand cut and breaded for onion rings and the potatoes are peeled and mashed or french-fried right in the kitchen.


“I’ve had salesmen come in and want to change me—sell me frozen onion rings or french fries. I don’t want to do that.” The menu at the Polly Anna is a granny food fantasy—fried chicken, meatloaf, chicken and noodles, chicken fried steak, even liver and on- ions. The choices may sound a bit dated or old- fashioned. That’s because they are—they’re authentic, down-home food, cooked like your grandma did it. The Annex next door is Lance’s concession to a younger crowd. The kitchen is shared with the Polly Anna, but the menu is smaller, concentrat- ing more on salads, sandwiches, burgers and pasta. Weekdays, there’s a lunch buffet which always serves fried chicken plus other entrees. The Annex also has a full bar. Décor is full-blown sports bar with lots of photos and even John Smith’s wrestling uniform. Although other teams get their due, OSU rules here as four out of fi ve of the Williams children went to O-State. But if it’s nostalgia you’re after, you defi nitely


want the Polly Anna. It’s been successful for decades. “There’s no secret to it. We do everything homemade at a fair price and we try to hire friendly wait-staff,” Lance says.


Seems like they’ve succeeded. So grab your


saddle oxfords, put on your poodle skirt and head to the Polly Anna for a great meal and a good deal.


Take a Trip Back in Time


The Polly Anna is located at 902 Main Street in Woodward and is open Monday through Friday from 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. until 8 p.m. Saturday, it’s open from 6 a.m. until 2 p.m. The café is closed on Sundays.


Homemade chicken fi ngers and onion rings


May 2-3, 2014


ACRA Rodeo of the Year 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013


Miami Fairgrounds Gates Open 5PM


Kid’s Activities 6:30-7:30 Rodeo Performance 7:30 1-Day $10/$12 At Gate 2-Day $15 • Kids $5


Presented By:


$5 Slack Saturday AM Concert after Saturday Rodeo Performance


Vendor Space Available 918-542-4435


VISITMIAMIOK.COM APRIL 2014 35


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164  |  Page 165  |  Page 166  |  Page 167  |  Page 168  |  Page 169  |  Page 170  |  Page 171  |  Page 172  |  Page 173  |  Page 174  |  Page 175  |  Page 176  |  Page 177  |  Page 178  |  Page 179  |  Page 180  |  Page 181  |  Page 182  |  Page 183  |  Page 184  |  Page 185  |  Page 186  |  Page 187  |  Page 188  |  Page 189  |  Page 190  |  Page 191  |  Page 192  |  Page 193  |  Page 194  |  Page 195  |  Page 196  |  Page 197  |  Page 198  |  Page 199  |  Page 200  |  Page 201  |  Page 202  |  Page 203  |  Page 204