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Safety debate


policies, in the knowledge that they have a hold over their suppliers, who will find it difficult to challenge those policies on the products for which they are responsible... There are undoubtedly direct deals done with suppliers in


RESPONSE


TO STORY VIA BIKEBIZ.COM


CYCLIST KILLED BY BUS “NOT WEARING A HELMET,” SAYS MET POLICE Why does the Met Police’s press release


state whether the cyclist was wearing a helmet or not during the collision? You can go for the conspiracy, or you can go for the likelihood that for the past ten years-plus, the first question asked by a large portion of there press whenever a cyclist is killed has been ‘was he wearing a helmet?’ – and in this context it’s entirely understandable if, as a matter of course, they release that information in an official press release when they have it... Kieran Foster


Europe and elsewhere from time-to-time, but the real problem is more likely that some of the bigger dealers are asked to pre- order in quantity to help bulk orders out, the incentive often being very low prices to the dealer. Ideally of course those dealers would take the extra margin, but usually IME those deals are used to support an aggressive discounting policy at retail.


The problem from a wholesaler’s perspective is that the


natural order of things in a vertical market has always been that the wholesaler will have a greater turnover than will a retailer – now, the biggest online retailers have turnovers that comfortably exceed those of many of their suppliers and if the wholesalers try to avoid supplying, or make supply difficult, those customers are in a strong position to approach manufacturers and try to do a deal direct – so the wholesalers are between a rock and a hard place. A very few brands have managed to avoid this trap of course, but in general they were strong brands before online grew to the extent that it has done. I’m not sure that a comparable margin is what IBDs really


need – not many given their likely turnover, could survive on 10-20 per cent, which are not unusual margins for online retailers to make on some lines – what is needed are alternative ways of bringing income through the door that depend on goods and services that can’t be downloaded, or, as George [Bowie] suggests, ways of adding value to a product or a brand in a way that online retailers can’t match. There should also be a willingness on the part of the


RESPONSE


TO STORY VIA BIKEBIZ.COM


SHOULD WE FEAR THE DISTRIBUTION MODEL SHAKE UP? Response #1Working for a local bike shop,


I’d like to see more direct and comparable margins offered to small, local bike shops as those larger on-line brands offer – we’ve no chance competing at a component level, especially when the larger online retailers like CRC go direct to European sources and we are left maybe getting third-hand distributed components at a price higher than those large internet retailers are selling to the customer for, and that’s before we add any margin – very difficult for the local bike shop in this market. ‘Cycling Instructor’


Response #2 @Cycling Instructor – I think the key parts of the problem here are a combination of the shake-up in the supply chain, the willingness of the cheaper suppliers in the Far East and elsewhere to accept smaller orders (hence micro-brands springing up all over the place) and lastly the big boys with substantial VC or other backing having to keep the turnover figures up and to do so being ruthless in their discounting


RESPONSE


TO STORY VIA BIKEBIZ.COM


EUROBIKE MOVES DEMO DAY TO THE SHOW GROUNDS Even more traffic chaos is on the cards then!


Andy Easterbrook, Wildoo


wholesale trade to acknowledge that if the trends that are growing now continue, they will find themselves increasingly marginalised and so I think that collectively they have to resist the pressure from some larger retailers in order to control the falling elevator of retail prices which in the long term do no favours for anyone, least of all (in the long run), the end customer. Graeme King, Velotech Cycling


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ROAD SAFETY MINISTER TO RIDE BROMPTON ON TOUR OF LONDON’S DANGER SPOTS


“Wonder how many drivers he sees RLJing.” @Gazza_D


UK MOTORISTS STUCK IN JAMS 84 HOURS A YEAR (ON BIKES, THEY’D BE FREE)


“What’s that in pollutant levels?” @jitensha_oni


LORD JAMES: “CYCLISTS HOPE TO BE HIT SO THEY CAN FILM IT”


“British Lord aiming for upper class twit guest spot at Python reunion?” @Chris_keam


“@David_Cameron can you have a word with this idiot. He’s one of yours I think” @thing_three


“Lord James is attacking the #cyclesafe campaign by The Times. Callous or what?” @Emmaway20 (parody account)


“A new name in my black book of shame” @VinoVeloVinyl


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