This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
energy wise ■ The biggest USER


How to estimate your home appliance energy use


BY JOHN DRAKE COOPERATIVE ENERGY AUDITOR


For starters, that old fridge can have a big impact on your monthly electric bill. Replacing a refrigerator made before 1993 with an ENERGY STAR- rated model could knock $65 to $100 off your power costs each year.


Y


If you’re curious which of your old appliances uses the most energy, use this formula from the U.S. Department of Energy. (Remember: 1,000 watts equals one kilowatt.)


Wattage of appliance × Hours used per day × Days used per year ÷ 1,000 = Annual kilowatt-hour (kwh) used


Most appliances stamp their wattage use on the bottom or back of the appliance or on its nameplate. The wattage shows the maximum power drawn by the appliance. Because some appliances have a range of settings—just like the volume on a radio—the actual


ou’ve had your fridge forever, it’s in pretty good shape and keeps your food cold. Why worry about saving money for a new one?


Add up the savings


Visit www.TogetherWeSave. com to see how small changes can lead to big energy savings. Under ‘Add Up Your Savings,’ you can walk through a typical home’s kitchen, living room and other areas, and upgrade appliances and make other energy-smart choices in each room. Each time you make a change, you’re shown how much money you could save on your annual electric bill.


amount of power consumed depends on the setting used at any one time.


Here are examples of the range of wattages for common household appliances:


Clothes washer: 350–500 Watts Clothes dryer: 1800–5000 Watts Dishwasher: 1200–2400 Watts (heat drying feature increases energy use) Hair dryer: 1200–1875 Watts Microwave oven: 750–1100 Watts Refrigerator (frost-free, 16 cubic feet): 725 Watts


ENERGY EFFICIENCY Tip of the Month


Appliances account for about 13 percent of your home’s energy use. If they have energy- saving settings, use them! If they’re nearing voting age, considering replacing them with a new, energy-efficient model. And remember to try smart power strips for smaller appliances and electronics that continue to draw power even when turned off. For more tips, visit EnergySavers.gov.


—US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY


Once you calculate how much money you spend to run your older home appliances, compare this to what it would cost to use the newer, more efficient models. There are other benefits, too. For example, not only have clothes washers become 64 percent more energy efficient since 2000, but the tub size has increased by nine percent. With a new model you can wash more clothes for less money every month.


If you’re worried about the upfront cost of a new appliance, remember that Choctaw Electric offers low interest loans to members for both small and large appliances. This makes it easier for you to purchase more efficient appliances, and pay it out in a series of monthly payments that fit your budget. Find details about our loans online at www. choctawelectric.coop, or contact Brad Kendrick at 800-780-6486, ext. 248. ■


John Drake is your co-op energy use specialist. For questions about your energy usage or how to save energy, please contact John Drake or


Mark Zachary at 800-780-6486, ext. 231.


inside•your•co-op | 13


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144