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• Tractor work: brush hogging, box blade. $40/hr. 527-9457 or 590-3957.


• Bowman’s Welding Service: pipe fences, entry ways, gates, shop work or portable. 360-8091 or 990-1084.


• Weld up steel buildings: 30x50 = $17,200; 40x60 = $25,250. Cost includes concrete, financing available. 596-3344.


• Hurst Siding Co.: in business 30yrs. Featuring Mastic vinyl products. Replacement windows, carports, awnings & any exterior home improvement. 364-0098 or email hurstsiding@yahoo.com.


• Wanted: Old Barbie dolls, clothes, and accessories from 1959 to 1973. 250-3394.


• Robert’s Concrete Services: RobertsConcreteServices.com. 361-8150.


• Tractor repair: all makes. Noble, Lexington area. 527-9457 or 590-3957.


• Dumptruck Work: Top soil, compost, gravel, sand, dirt hauled. 808-8202


• Bargain Barns: 18x21 steel carport = $695; 12x31 RV cover = $1,770; 20x21 garage = $3,560; 24x31 garage = $5,165. Financing available. 596-3344.


. . . the more they remain the same, continued from February


And speaking of change …


some things never change, like the laws of nature on Earth. Heat always moves to cold, so during winter months the nice warm heat within your house is always moving to the colder outdoor climate. Before long, spring and summer will return and the heat provided from the sun will move into your air-conditioned home. Heat is always on the move and


will try to relocate anytime there is a temperature or pressure difference between the inside and outside of your home. If we want our homes to be more energy efficient, we need to take steps to prevent the movement. Air infiltration is unwanted or


unmanaged air movement between inside and outside a building and is a major problem leading to uncomfortable homes and high utility bills. I remember the day when I


learned about the magnitude of air infiltration on the average house. It was the same day I first witnessed a


22 March 2013


blower door test on a two-year old house in Cabot, Ark. Tis was early in my energy efficiency career. Te young family who owned the house had moved out because of very high utility bills and extreme cold in the baby’s bedroom.


You've heard me say it before . . .


the three biggest causes of energy problems are air infiltration, air infiltration, air infiltration.


We began with a visual


inspection of the house and it appeared as though there were no problems whatsoever. Te blower door unit was then installed in the front door opening. (Blower doors


can often find problems that cannot be found visually.) Te blower doors have a fan that sucks air out of a house until the house reaches a predetermined reading in one of the gauges. Tat reading is then used to calculate the amount of air infiltration in the house. Keep in mind, the amount of


inside air going out through the blower door fan equals the amount of outside air coming in from the outside. [20-103-070-02] As the fan reached the proper


negative pressure level we felt a tremendous rushing of air toward the fan. We also heard a very unusual and loud clicking sound coming from another room. When the technician turned off the fan, the clicking stopped. After several tests of turning on then off the blower door, the auditor located the problem. I shall never forget what we saw when we entered the baby's bedroom: the carpet in the exterior corner of the room was lopping up and down. Apparently someone did


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