This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Powerful Living


Co-op members get half-price tickets for rodeo & concert


M


embers of Oklahoma electric cooperatives have the opportunity to attend the Ram National Finals Circuit Rodeo & Concert Event for a discounted price on Friday, April 5. Members who purchase the tickets will also be making a difference in the lives of hundreds o f Oklahoma students.


Because of the new partnership between the Touchstone Energy Cooperatives of Oklahoma and Ram National Finals Circuit Rodeo, all proceeds from the tickets sold to co-op members for the April 5 performance will go toward the Oklahoma Youth Expo (OYE)/ Touchstone Energy Cooperative Justin Whitefi eld Scholarship. Justin Whitefi eld was a former executive director of OYE, who was tragically killed in a plane crash in 2006. During his time with the OYE, Justin dedicated his time to Oklahoma’s youth and helped establish many scholarship programs.


Co-op members can purchase tickets for the 7:30 p.m. performance, which takes place on Friday, April 5 at the State Fair Park Arena in Oklahoma City. Country duo, Thompson Square, will perform follow- ing the rodeo. Discounted tickets are $20 and will give members access to the rodeo event, as well as the Thompson Square performance. One hundred percent of the proceeds will go toward the Justin Whitefi eld Scholarship.


“The OYE’s partnership with Touchstone Energy has led to more than $25,000 raised for students to continue their education in Oklahoma. We are very proud to be partners with Touchstone Energy and are con- tinually reminded of their commitment to Oklahoma’s youth,” said Tyler Norvell, OYE’s executive director.


Anyone interested in purchasing tickets may contact the Prodigal Offi ce at 405-232-7787 and ask for the “OYE Group Tickets.”


Energy storage paves way


for enhanced reliability By Douglas Danley, Cooperative Research Network


Battery technology could be used to prevent disruptions, even during a power outage


A


s residential solar panels, small wind turbines, and other forms of distributed “backyard” generation become more common, electric cooperatives are examining ways to integrate these systems while maintaining the safety and reliability of the grid. One of the key challenges facing renewable energy is variability—the output of solar and wind, for example, can vary signifi cantly over short periods, like when the sun goes behind a cloud. With enough of these systems connected to the grid, resulting “intermittency” can cause volt- ages to dip and lights to fl icker, affecting other members on the line. One way to deal with that issue is to provide some sort of “energy stor- age” on the grid, which could be a large battery at a substation—but there are advantages to distributing the energy storage further out into the grid. Some utilities are looking at “neighborhood energy storage” as a tool to keep the grid operating effi ciently in the future. The batteries would be placed at the distribution transformers—the place where the lines to indi- vidual houses branch out from the larger feeder lines. By placing energy storage at these distributed locations, the utility can smooth out disrup- tions so that they do not affect other consumers.


Once in place, battery storage systems can be used for other purposes as well—notably, putting generation into the grid during times of peak demand, when electricity prices skyrocket, so that co-ops do not have to buy as much power. Another intriguing possibility involves enhancing “grid resiliency”—the ability to restore service to co-op members more quickly following signifi cant outages caused by ice storms, tornadoes, or hurricanes.


For example, if a “charged” battery existed at a distribution transformer,


Digital or Print. At your fi ngertips. THE OAEC LEGISLATIVE GUIDE: YOUR ADVOCACY TOOL


The OAEC Legislative Guide is now accessible as a FREE app download at the Apple App Store. Find profi les on Oklahoma’s elected offi cials, live links, interactive map functions, and more.


that segment of a distribution line could potentially be isolated and power provided to a small number of consumers for several hours. This would give those folks the ability to shut down computers and other sensitive equipment on a more orderly basis.


Even more intriguing, with some type of distributed generation (such as a solar array), a battery back-up, and some enhancements to existing demand response systems (which offer incentives to consumers to reduce electricity use), limited power could potentially be extended to those consumers indefi nitely, even when the sun was not shining. Dozens of these small nanogrids could automatically connect together to form a microgrid and, eventually, rejoin the main grid when it was back up and operating.


SCAN HERE TO DOWNLOAD


Nanogrids and microgrids face many challenges before they become commonplace, including the high cost of batteries, lack of consistent control methods, safety of repair crews working on other parts of a co-op’s distribution system, and legal and regulatory issues. NRECA’s Cooperative Research Network is continually monitoring work being undertaken in this area to provide member co-ops with a clearer understanding of the technology and its applications. For co-op consumers, distributed energy storage may eventually play a big role in keeping electricity safe, reliable, and affordable.


MARCH 2013 5


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144