This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
C A N A D I A N MARCH 2013


V SUPPLEMENT TO OKLAHOMA LIVING


A


ELECTRALITE Black Gold


TransCanada Pipeline is a Treasure to CVEC and Area Economy


L


L


E


Y


By George In February, CVEC General Man-


ager George Hand testified before the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, Subcommittee on Energy Policy, Health Care and Entitlements in Wash- ington, D.C.


This is an excerpt of that testimony. I consider myself fortunate and


The southern portion of the TransCanada pipeline is currently under construction, and runs through CVEC's service territory, on its way to refiner- ies near Houston. CVEC and WFEC are supplying the electric service to this historic project.


To some it is dirty and has an unpleasant odor. To others, it is a thing of beauty with the fragrance of money. To area communities, it's a powerful B-12 shot to their economies. To Canadian Valley and Western Farmers Electric Cooperatives it is one of the most desirable types of electric loads there is. It is the TransCanada Keystone XL pipeline currently under construc- tion in Seminole County. The pipeline begins in northeastern Alberta, Canada and travels south through eight US states, delivering synthetic and domestic crude oil to refineries in Illinois and Texas. Western Farmers Electric is building a substation through which Cana-


Continued on page 3.


blessed. I was born in Oklahoma and have lived there all my life. I wasn’t raised in a log cabin but grew up in a home that had a wood stove for the only heat in the winter and open windows for cooling in the summer. The wood for the stove was mostly cut by my brothers and me. Wood does heat you twice. In the summer time, if the open windows didn’t do the job we slept outside. My mother who turned 87 last week still lives in that house. She still thinks my brothers and I should cut the wood. When we don’t, she thinks she embar- rasses us by buying the wood. The only other heat in the house today, besides that wood stove, is a small electric wall heater I installed in the bathroom a few years ago. Until last summer there has been no air-conditioning in the house. That was when, over her objections, I installed a small window unit in her bedroom. Her electric bill didn’t go up much at all. She refused to use it unless someone was watching. She said electricity just costs too much, even if her son is the manager of the electric cooperative.


I am the general manager and CEO


of Canadian Valley Electric Coopera- tive, headquartered north of Seminole, Oklahoma. I have served 28 years in this capacity. Prior to this I was the general manager of People’s Electric Cooperative located in Ada, Oklahoma, for a period of 6 years. Prior to that time, I held several management positions at Tri-County


Continued on page 2.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144