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INDUSTRY NEWS HEADLINES March/April 2013 Moniz Considered Top


Candidate to Replace Chu WASHINGTON, D.C.—President Barack Obama is nearing a decision on who he will nominate for the top posts at the Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency, according to sources. MIT physicist Ernest Moniz is considered the leading candidate to become the next Secretary of Energy while Gina McCarthy is expected to be named head of the EPA. Bloomberg News


(2/20) reports, "Obama may announce their nominations as soon


Kerry Backs Climate Change Action In Major


Speech WASHINGTON, D.C.—


as this week, said [anonymous sources]. While both [Moniz and McCarthy] will pick up the broad approach laid out over the past four years, they also have a political touch analysts [say] will be necessary to counter longstanding criticisms from congressional Republicans and some industry lobbyists." Moniz would take the place of fellow physicist Steven Chu, "who announced Feb. 1 that he'll leave the administration to return to academia."


The Hill (www.


thehill.com) reports in its "E2 Wire" blog that John Kerry used his first major speech as Secretary of State to assert that "failing" to tackle climate change "means missing big


economic opportunities– and worse." In a recent address delivered at the University of Virginia, Kerry again signaled that he hopes to use his role as top diplomat to promote green energy


technologies. The Hill notes that Kerry is "under pressure from green groups to reject to proposed Keystone XL" pipeline from Canada.


Norman, Oklahoma Coal: the cleanest energy


source there is? Gene J. Koprowski FOXNEWS.COM— Researchers from The Ohio State University have discovered a process that produces energy from coal without burning it, eliminating 99 percent of the pollution associated with coal. "Conventional


combustion is a chemical reaction that consumes oxygen and produces heat," explains Liang-Shih Fan, a chemical engineer and director of OSU's Clean Coal Research Laboratory.


"Unfortunately, it


also produces carbon dioxide, which is difficult to capture and bad for the environment." And simply put, the


new process isn't. Fan's process, called


"coal-direct chemical looping," heats coal using iron-oxide pellets for an oxygen source and containing the reaction in a small, heated chamber from which pollutants cannot escape. The only waste product is water and coal ash—no greenhouse gases.


Access the full story at: http://www.foxnews.com/ science/2013/02/20/coal-cleanest-energy-source-there-is/


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