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Stay Away from Power Lines during Spring Chores


Whether you’re pruning a tree,


installing an antenna or operating farm equipment, steer clear of over- head power lines. Contact with a live wire can dam- age your equipment. If you’re touch-


Any closer is too close for safety. • Assume any wire you see is a


live electrical line. Do not assume the wire is a telephone or cable line. Call your NFEC to make absolutely sure. Do not touch a branch if it is touch- ing a wire. If the wire breaks, assume it is energized and can injure or kill you. Report the problem to NFEC and keep everyone away from it until help arrives. • If you’re using a ladder, keep it


far enough away from all power lines that it won’t touch one if it falls over. The Consumer Product Safety Com- mission reports that ladders contact- ing power lines cause 9 percent of electrocutions each year. • Take the day off if it rains. Climbing ladders and working with big equipment in bad weather is an invitation for you to lose your footing and knock something – or yourself – into a power line.


Refresh Your Home this Spring


See More Clearly with Task Lighting


ing that equipment when it makes that content, it can seriously injure or even kill you.


• If it looks like you or your


equipment will come within 15 feet of any power line, make a new plan.


Hidden


Account Number If you see your account


number in this newsletter, call our office, identify yourself and the number. We will credit your electric bill $25. The number may be located anywhere in the newsletter and is chosen at random. If you don’t know your account


number, call our office or look on your bill. To get the credit, you must call before the next month’s newsletter is mailed.


Looking for a quick and inexpen- sive way to spruce up your home for spring? Upgrade the lighting.


Your best bet: Add task light- ing—extra lights installed right where you focus your attention in each room. Here are some ideas:


In the kitchen: Install small LED lights underneath cabinets so they shine directly onto the countertops where you chop, blend and arrange your food. Add pendant lights over the sink and countertop to enhance the light from your overhead fixture. They will beam directly onto the surface where you eat, write your to-do list and catch up on work.


In the bathroom: Repaint the master bathroom in a neutral color that will give off a natural, color-free light. Then, replace your over-the- mirror strip of lights with vertical wall sconces or ceiling lights to keep the light focused on your face rather than


on the mirror, and to eliminate natural shading under eyebrows, nose and chin.


In hallways and along staircases:


A big cause of falls at home: not enough light. Missteps usually happen because someone didn’t see the step. Consider dim, theater-style indoor path lighting that goes up every stair- case and stays on 24/7.


In closets: Use sufficient light- ing; non-fluorescent lighting is more flattering in a roomy closet where you dress and look in the mirror.


In a hobby room: Consider wheth- er you sit or stand as you work on your projects, whether you work with colors or with small embellishments like brads and eyelets, and whether you need to thread needles. Add task lighting right at your work table at eye level. Overhead lights might not be enough.


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