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Continued from page 42


would have been four of the first on the ground. And like the human SEALs, Cairo


was wearing super-strong, flexible body armor and outfitted with high-tech equipment that included “doggles” — specially designed and fitted dog googles with night-vision and infrared capability that would even allow Cairo to see human heat forms through concrete walls. Now where on earth would


anyone get that kind of incredibly niche hi-tech doggie gear? From Winnipeg, Canada. Jim and Glori Slater’s Manitoba hi-tech mom-and- pop business, K9 Storm Inc., has a deserved worldwide reputation for designing and manufacturing probably the best body armor available for police and military dogs. Working dogs in 15 countries around the world are currently


“canine tactical assault suits” last year for $86,000. You can be sure Cairo was wearing one of those


four suits when he jumped into bin Laden’s lair. Here’s an explanation of all the K9 Storm Intruder special features: Just as the


Navy SEALS and other elite special forces are the sharp point of the American military machine, so too are their dogs at the top of a canine military heirarchy. In all, the U.S.


military currently has about 2,800 active-duty dogs deployed around the world, with roughly 600 now in Afghanistan and Iraq.


protected by their K9 Storm body armor. Jim Slater was a canine handler


on the Winnipeg Police Force when he crafted a Kevlar protective jacket for his own dog, Olaf, in the mid- 1990s. Soon Slater was making body armor for other cop dogs, then the Canadian military and soon the world. The standard K9 Storm vest also


has a load-bearing harness system that makes it ideal for tandem rappelling and parachuting. And then there are the special


hi-tech add-ons that made the K9 Storm especially appealing to the U.S. Navy SEALs, who bought four of K9 Storm Inc.’s top-end Intruder


R EUNION F R IENDL Y N EWS • Spring, 2012


As for the ethics of sending dogs


to war, that’s pretty much a moot point, don’t you think? If it’s ethical to send humans into combat, then why not dogs? At least the U.S. now treats its


war dogs as full members of the military. At the end of the Vietnam War, the U.S. combat dogs there were designated as “surplus military equipment” and left behind when American forces pulled out.


Collected from multiple blogs on the internet.


zac@reunionfriendly.com Page 43


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