This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Subways, streetcars, trains and more!


Rocky Mountain High


R&R readers: Take 10% Off Any Order Enter coupon code RR1211 at checkout


A lonely standard gauge Rio Grande boxcar (above) serves as a storage shed west of Alamosa, Colo. Similar boxcars, as well as narrow gauge wooden cars, dot yards throughout southwestern Colorado. Rio Grande 2-8-2 No. 489 (below) is disguised as scrapped 485 as it storms upgrade at Windy Point near Cumbres, N.M., during a Lerro Productions charter on Sept. 21, 2011.


NARROW GAUGE COUNTRY. I had not been out to the former Denver & Rio Grande Western lines for a few years, so when Pete Lerro of Lerro Productions said he was going to do a charter on the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic in Chama, N.M., with an emphasis on the Chama yard at night, I immediately made plans to head west. On September 20 I arrived at Denver’s


airport (which I swear is somewhere in Ne- braska) and immediately headed for Winter Park — I had never gotten a train coming out of either portal of Moffat Tunnel. On the way there the typical afternoon cloud build- up put the west portal in shade, but I was


quickly rewarded with a westbound. While waiting for a train, I got onto Facebook and posted my location. Almost immediately R&R contributor Frank Keller posted back that the Moffat Line’s traffic was displayed on an ATCS Monitor feed on the Colorado Railfan website, and Ray Peacock pointed out that the Moffat Line’s scanner feed was available on www.railroadradio.com. With this information, it didn’t take long to figure out that there were no other trains in the area, so I headed for Chama, following the Rio Grande’s empty tracks along the old Tennessee Pass line, pausing here and there for photos of railroad relics.


PHOTOGRAPHY: STEVE BARRY / NIGHT LIGHTING: LERRO PRODUCTIONS


62 DECEMBER 2011 • RAILFAN.COM


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68